Do Most Insurance Companies Cover V Beam for Rosacea?

Doctor Answers 7

VBeam for Rosacea very effective but cosmetic

Dear IC:

The VBeam laser is very effective for the treatment of redness associated with Rosacea.  My patients who complains of intermittent flushing and looking embarrassed are very satisfied with their results after just a few treatments.  I have treated many patients with this laser, but unfortunately, I have not been able to get insurance to cover for this. I often use this in combination with topical treatments to effectively manage Rosacea.

While topical medications can stop the progression of redness and blood vessels, they are only minimally effective for existing background redness. Blood vessels or telangiectases are most effectively treated with a Pulsed-Dye Laser (V Beam) and Intense Pulsed Light (IPL). Laser treatment causes selective injury to the blood vessels, which makes them disappear. Most patients will notice some swelling, redness, and even bruising after laser treatments which lasts 2-5 days. A series of treatments (3-5) are usually required for optimal results. As patients with rosacea have a tendency to form new blood vessels, maintenance treatments may be needed.  

Best of Luck!

-Dr. Mann

Cleveland Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Insurance companies don't cover VBeam laser

In my experience since the VBeam laser is considered cosmetic, insurance companies don't cover the treatments. Other treatments that would be covered can include a mix of topical treatments (including antibiotics and anti-inflammatory gels) and oral medications (including antibiotics), only if absolutely necessary. We try to avoid oral prescriptions and our patients appreciate our approach which is unique to our practice. Oral medications can help to reduce inflammation and clear up breakouts.

Dennis Gross, MD
New York Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

...Medicare partially covers in Australia

In Australia, Medicare does cover some of the treatments for rosacea providing criteria are met- this includes 

1. The use of a laser machine (NOT IPL)

2. Blood vessels MUST be visible at 3 m or longer- so it does not cover for redness of rosacea, but broken capillaries....I know, it sounds silly, but those are the rules. 

3. Maximum of 6 treatments per year (which I think is v v v generous)

Hope that helps, regardsDr Davin Lim Consultant Laser and Cosmetic Dermatologist Brisbane, Australia

Davin Lim, MBBS, FACD
Brisbane Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

V-Beam is usually not covered

V-Beam is considered a purely cosmetic procedure and isn't covered by health insurance. Shopping around for deals is important, but be careful. You don't necessarily want to use the cheapest person. Instead, find someone with experience.

Gary Goldenberg, MD
New York Dermatologist

Insurance usually does not cover Vbeam

Vbeam works beautifully for the treatment of rosacea associated redness. Insurance coverage varies by state and insurer. Unfortunately, in Massachusetts, where I practice I have yet to have an insurance company cover this treatment. Most patients who pay for the procedure out of pocket feel it is worth the investment.

Pamela Norden, MD, MBA
Wellesley Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

V Beam

The V Beam is a great laser for treating redness and small vessels associated with Rosacea.  In my experience insurance companies will cover medications for Rosacea but not laser or IPL treatments.

Jerome Potozkin, MD
Danville Dermatologic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Vbeam for rosacea

Unfortunately, I have never found insurance companies to cover Vbeam for the redness that develops with Rosacea.  However, it does work very well, so it will be money well spent if you ever decide to have it done.

Yoash R. Enzer, MD, FACS
Providence Oculoplastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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