I've had my 2nd BA and had two draining tubes due to capsular contracture on my left breast. Do I Have an Infection? (photo)

I've had my 2nd BA on October 4th and had two draining tubes in them due to capsular contracture on my left breast. My PS re did both through the nipple and they have been a little red on the lower part of my breast along with feeling a little warm. I have not had a fever or chills. My PS has me on 3 different antibiotics. Will the antibiotics take care of it if I do have an infection or will I have to get them removed?

Doctor Answers (7)

Possible Breast Implant Infection

+1

It is not possible to determine a breast implant infection from a photograph in most cases.  Usual symptoms of an implant infection are swelling, warmth, redness of the breast and fever.   It is very difficult to tell from your photograph if there is a problem. Sometimes simply the healing process after surgery can give the skin a warm reddish hue.  Follow your surgeon's instructions and if you feel uncomfortable with your care a second opinion can sometimes be helpful.

Best of luck.


Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Is it an infection after a breast augmentation?

+1

Hello,

Thank you for sharing your photos.

Unfortunately, it is not possible to determine whether you exhibit an infection or not based on the photos and your description alone; a physical examination is required.

At this point, I recommend that you follow your surgeon's instructions religiously and once your antibiotic treatment is over results could be assessed and further actions taken if needed.

I hope this helps.

Thank you for your inquiry and the best of luck to you.

Dr. Sajjadian

Ali Sajjadian, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 120 reviews

?infection

+1

I don't see anything abnormal in the photo, but that doesn't eliminate the possibility of a problem. I also don't quite understand what has happened that has led you to have been prescribed three antibiotics for what is now a month after surgery. I would think about asking an infectious disease consultant's opinion in this setting. 

Antibiotics can sometimes resolve an infection short of having to remove implants. What I can't tell is if there has been any evidence of an infection. Continue to follow up with your surgeon.

Thanks and best wishes. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

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It is possible to save an implant with antibiotics

+1

Hello,

Thank you for the question and photos.  If you do have an infection the infection may be able to be taken care of with antibiotics.  The difficulty is in knowing which bacteria is causing the infection and having the implant as a an object without blood supply.  If the oral antibiotics are not taking care of the issue your plastic surgeon will have to assess the need for IV antibiotics or going back in and washing everything out as well as taking a culture.

All the best,

Dr Remus Repta

Remus Repta, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 92 reviews

Hello

+1
An infection cannot be diagnosed over a picture. You need to see your surgeon to determine that. You need to make an appointment with your doctor as soon as possible.

Stuart B. Kincaid, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Residual redness after breast implant revision surgery

+1

Just based on the photo alone, the redness may not be attributed to infection. However, since you are on 3 antibiotics, the infection may be suppressed. At some point the antibiotics have to be stopped and how your breasts respond will determine what course of action to take. It's important to follow up closely with your plastic surgeon.

Best Wishes,

Stewart Wang, MD FACS, Wang Plastic Surgery

Stewart Wang, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Are my breast implants infected?

+1

Everything looks fine on the photo, but you really need to see your surgeon, particularly if you are worried about infection.  We tend to treat any possible infection quite aggressively because if it gets to the implant, the implant may need to be removed, as you say.  Good luck.

Jonathan J. Staiano, FRCS (Plast)
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.