Slight Dent in Breast Implant? (photo)

I had breast augmentation 1 week ago. Yesterday I noticed a slight dent in my right implant near my cleavage. I am wondering if this is common while the implants settle and if so will it go away? I know it is very early in my recovery stage so I want to know if it is typical or possibly a sign of a larger dent or something more serious to come? I am also noticing a vibrating sensation when I move my arms. Is that air? I am seeing my PS in a week, but would love opinions in the mean time Thanks!

Doctor Answers 11

Dent in breast

I see what you are talking about. It looks like your implants are under the muscle and the dent is a small band of muscle.  It will probably stretch out and go away over time.  Give it a few months.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Slight Dent in Breast Implant

This looks like an indentation from an insertion of the pectoralis tendon into the sternum (breastbone). It is quite likely that as your body forms a capsule around the implant that this will become less noticeable, or unnoticeable. 

Thank you for your question and for the photo. All the best. 

Breast augmentation

The shape on the inner portion of your right breast is the border of your pectoralis.  As you said, it is VERY EARLY.  I wouldn't worry about it at this point.  This is far from your final result.

Talmage Raine MD FACS 

drraine.com

Talmage J. Raine, MD, FACS
Champaign Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Contour Irregularities Following Breast Implants

Small contour irregularities are extremely common following any surgery due to swelling.  One week is too early to draw any conclusions regarding your final result.  The vibrating sensation in your breast may be caused by friction between the implant and surrounding tissues. This is also quite common in the early stages of recovery and typically resolves on its own.   If you are concerned, you should feel free to contact your plastic surgeon prior to your scheduled follow-up appointment so that they may personally address your concerns. Good luck to you. 

Steven L. Ringler, MD, FACS
Grand Rapids Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

"Dent" will usually "round out" over time. "Vibrating sensation" is called Bourdonnement (it's normal and will go away)!

The "dent" you see is caused by slight imperfection in the "roundness" of your implant pocket. In this location there are still muscle fiber attachments to the sternum that can flatten the implant edge roundness, but time will stretch these fibers somewhat, and your implant pocket will also form a scar capsule (hopefully a thin, soft, pliable one rather than a thick, tight, contracted one) which naturally rounds out any minor non-circularities as it heals and matures.

Think of a water droplet as it leaves your faucet. It is elongated as gravity pulls it from contact with the faucet, but surface tension immediately rounds out the droplet as it breaks free from the faucet.

So does the scar around your implant--the collagen bundles form the capsule around your round implant, and the collagen tightening that normally occurs tends to pull (minor) irregularities into roundness. Too large a "dent" and this cannot be completely overcome by normal healing, but your slight "dent" will definitely improve, and may in fact settle completely as swelling diminishes and healing progresses. At this stage in your recovery, reassurance is indeed the most appropriate response! Time and several months will let you see the changes that will occur; things should be fine, but no one can guarantee this, even your surgeon!

Your new implant sliding against the stretched moist tissues causes a friction rub (sound) that can be felt as well as occasionally heard. This is termed "bourdonnement" and was definitively described in the plastic surgery literature: "Bourdonnement and other benign temporary breast implant sounds", Annals of Plastic Surgery, Vol 43 p589, 1999.

The inflammation that causes this sound resolves as the healing process goes forward. It generally goes away in a few days to weeks, but can occasionally take longer, depending on how long your healing process takes.

Those of us who still use a stethescope for listening to patients' chests will occasionally hear distinctive sounds such as this that indicate lung/chest (pleural) inflammation that can aid in diagnosis. In your case this sound only indicates that your healing is incomplete. Best wishes!

Richard H. Tholen, MD, FACS
Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 182 reviews

Dent in implant

Why wait a week to see your operative surgeon?? Best to be seen now with all your early postoperative concerns. I see my breast implant patients on day 2 day 5 or 7. Sounds like you need some TLC and questions answered by your chosen surgeon. Or at least call him/her to discuss these issues. 

Early asymmetry after breast augmentation surgery

It is not unusual to have minor asymmetries after breast augmentation.  The vibration that you are feeling is some air in the pocket between your breast implant and your breast tissue.  This will dissipate over the next week or so.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Breast augmentation at one week

At one week after breast augmentation, you are visibly swollen. Minor irregularities often correct with time.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Contour irregularities early after breast augmentation are not a source of concern.

Implants in patients with very modest breast tissue can yield palpable and visible contour irregularities. However in the picture the patient is early in postoperative convalescence. This is too early to make a judgment.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Dent in Breast after Breast Augmentation

             If you had very little tissue prior to the breast augmentation, feeling the ripples in the implant shell is common.  Saline or Silicone?  Saline tends to ripple more.  Hard to say for sure. 

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.