Ask a doctor

Indented Columella Scar More Noticeable over the Years? (photo)

I had a rhinoplasty 5 years ago and my columella scar had become more prominent and indented over the last 2 years. Can this be corrected using dermabrasion (or a similar treatment) or do I need to undergo a scar revision?

Doctor Answers (4)

Scar revision from open rhinoplasty

+2

It looks like you may benefit from a scar revision of your open rhinoplasty incision. Best to be seen in person.  Good luck.


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Indented Columella Scar More Noticeable over the Years?

+2

This is one of the complication of open rhinoplasty. ONLY scar revision will help. Best to see your surgeon to discuss 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

Indented Columella Scar More Noticeable over the Years?

+2

The photo you've provided does appear to show a significant indent in your transcolumellar scar. It is hard to tell for sure without seeing a profile view but dermabrasion likely will not provide enough benefit to camouflage the scar. Scar revision (cutting out and replacing the widened scar with a finer scar) is likely the best option. Seek an in person consultation with a Facial Plastic Surgeon for more specific advice. I hope this information is helpful.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

You might also like...

Columellar scar after rhinoplasty

+2

Your picture is not ideal to view your scar, but if your columellar scar is depressed, it's possible that a filler could be used to help raise it and make it less noticeable.  The other option would be to have the scar surgically revised.  

Michael I. Echavez, MD
San Francisco Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.