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Indent After Punch Biopsy - Will It Fill In? (photo)

I had a punch biopsy on the end of my nose 10 days ago to have a mole removed. Had stitches out after 7 days and healing ok but I am upset to see that the wound is quite indented. I'm getting married in a month and worried I'll look a mess on the day that every girl wants to look their best :-( The shadows the indent casts look awful. Is this likely to fill in as it heals? What can I do to help/speed healing? Have some silicone gel and sheet but not sure if I'm doing the right thing.

Doctor Answers (5)

Scalpel Sculpting Followed By Dermaplaning Is An Excellent Method For Cosmetically Removing Moles

+1

Post-surgical indentations following punch removals do tend to fill in with time, albeit slowly (taking up to six months sometimes to do so). However, in areas under tension, such as the tip of the nose, it is likely that a small divet may remain. For these reasons, I am not much of a fan of cutting and stitching for cosmetically removing moles.

Although removing moles by any method from the face is likely to leave a small scar, scalpel sculpting, which involves no deep cutting or stitches has, in my experience, proven quite successful for achieving gratifying aesthetic results while leaving little, or often barely perceptible, scars.

The technique, which I have been using for thirty years, involves "scultping the mole" off from the surrounding skin in a tangential fashion (i.e. not cutting deeply into the skin). Deep cutting will inevitably result in a scar, while superficial (horizontal) removal in this fashion largely avoids this. Elliptical and fusiform simply describe the resulting shape of a wound excision after cutting them out deeply and before the placement of the sutures.

Following scalpel sculpting, the borders of the mole can then be smoothed and blended with the surrounding normal skin by "dermaplaning," a technique by which the edge of the scalpel is used to delicately abrade the skin. Properly done, the entire procedure, performed under local anesthesia, takes no more than three to five minutes.  In most cases, the procedure is done at the time of the consultation.

 


New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Healing post punch biopsy

+1

Hello

You will heal well on this area, however it will still have a dint in it and it will still be red in 4 weeks time.  You should continue to massage the area and tape it to minimise the scarring.  Can massage with some silicon based cream or vitamin e oli or cream. Remember it is not the product you place on the scar but more the physcial massage which aids the scar breakdown.

Long term it will look good.

Stephen Salerno

 

Stephen Salerno, MBBS, FRACS
Melbourne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Mole removed with punch biopsy and then stitched with an indentation

+1

Removing it with a punch biopsy is an okay way to remove it. But if there were some proper techniques done you can get some wound spreading. The biopsy really needs to be done with a wedge fashion.

Philip Young, MD
Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

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It will improve

+1

It's always better to delay such procedure when ur having major event in ur life ,I think the best is to avoid sun,apply sunscreen regularly and I suggest applying a get called contractubex twice a day to the scar   Plus u can apply similar skin color foundation to camouflage the color change if it's still there by the wedding time ....and congratulations 

Nawarah Alarfaj, MD
Saudi Arabia Plastic Surgeon

Bad Timing For Elective Procedure

+1

If this was a benign mole then you timing was not optimal.   But let's deal with what you have now. If two weeks before the big day, I would inject a small amount of Restylane and have you buy Dermablend make-up. You will be a stunning bride!

 

Jay S. Gottlieb, DO
Fort Lauderdale Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.