Incision-less Laser Vaginal Rejuvenation by Gyneshape?

I heard of Incisionless vaginal rejuvenation via laser that shrinks the vaginal walls without using the scaple. I'm really interested in it but I have not seen much reviews from people who have actually done it, do you think it would work? The laser is called gyneshape and was created by dr zipper who I believe is a gynecologist.

Doctor Answers 4

Laser Vaginal Rujuvination

Laser Vaginal Rejuvination has been around in one form or another for over ten years.  Although "shrinking" of the vaginal walls may be beneficial, the vast majority of patients seeking/needing tightening of the vaginal vault require an actual incision to get to the supportive/structural muscles of the vagina to then tighten them with sutures.  I always recommend seeking consultation with a board certified surgeon whom is knowledgeable and able to perform both procedures so that you get an unbiased opinion.  Best of luck...RAS 


Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

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Incision-less Laser Vaginal Rejuvenation by Gyneshape?

If you want lasting results, you need to have an incision in order to suture the muscle and tighten the vaginal wall.  A laser will temporarily tighten the mucosa but it will restretch pretty quickly.

Laser Vaginal Tightening

Gyneshape, introduced several years ago, was the first laser technology marketed in the US for vaginal tightening. Dr Zipper is a friend and very skilled colleague. Since then, large international laser companies with equally large marketing budgets have introduced their versions of nonsurgical vaginal tightening.

The Mona Lisa Touch, the FemiLift, and the IntimaLase procedures are nonsurgical laser procedures that treat the skin of the vaginal canal. They use the same technology of fractional laser skin peeling used for the face. These procedures are examples of laser vaginal tightening (LVT) - actually laser vaginal skin tightening. They don't cause the vaginal skin to peel and they don't require anesthesia.

As for success and failure, consider the following:

When the vagina loosens after childbirth, it's the muscles that have loosened. The skin stretches too, but the distances between the levator muscles (Kegel muscles) and the muscles of perineum is commonly permanently widened. In addition, the attachments of pelvic floor muscles, the bladder, and the rectum can become damaged. Procedures generally known as vaginoplasty and pelvic floor reconstruction are designed to fix the damage, tighten the muscles, and tighten the skin to create a long lasting and effective solution. LVT, cures none of these things. It's designed to provide a mild superficial and temporary shrink to the vaginal skin only, not the muscles and not to damage to the pelvic floor. It's a trade-off. If you want something that works well and lasts a long time, consider vaginoplasty. If you want something less effective, temporary and cheap, then LVT might be your thing.

Marco A. Pelosi III, MD
Jersey City Cosmetic Gynecologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Gyneshape and vaginal tightening

Any vaginoplasty which does not involve tightening of the pelvic muscles will be of short-lived usefulness as the vaginal lining is very stretchy and will quickly revert to its original state. In order for a vaginoplasty to be fully effective one needs to tighten the pelvic musculature in addition to tightening the vaginal mucosa. Modalities like this have been tried for loose skin of the face and neck and have been of very limited effectiveness and value. I suggest that you consult with a board-certified surgeon who has experience in vaginoplasty and vaginal reconstruction. Good luck

Johan E. Brahme, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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