My Breast Augmentation Incision is Infected. What Should I Do?

Its been 6 months since i had my surgery however the incision from the right breast has become infected, there is two small blisters which seem to have pus,cultivation was performed im currently taking antibiotics to fight this bacteria (staph) im not sure if i should i wash the incision?? should i use soap? is there anything i can do to resolve this please help me, my doctor suggested to remove the infected one or both implants eventhough the infection is only in one side, why did this happen

Doctor Answers (7)

Breast infection

+1

It sounds like you had a stitch abscess that developed along your incision, but I could not be sure without an exam.


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Breast augmentation

+1

Infection following a breast augmentation is very rare.  It is likely that a suture was never absorbed by your body so now it is being extruded.  This needs to be addressed soon because it could develop into a more major infection involving your implant.

Shahin Javaheri, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Breast implant wound is draining

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Implant infection is truly a rare event and happens in the range of 1 out of a 1000. It is difficult to assess if your infection is a localized suture abscess or possible infected area of fat necrosis versus a true implant infection. In the case of the latter, the entire breast tends to be swollen and red.. Generally speaking a course of antibiotics may be recommended initially and implant removal may be eventually required. Some surgeons will replace the implants while most would remove and replace at a later date.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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Infection after breast augmentation

+1

Sorry you are having this problem as no plastic surgeon ever wants to have something like this.  If there is truly an implant infection inside the pocket then you may need to have surgery.  If this is only a suture line incision then just opening the infected are may allow it to heal without jeopardizing the implant.  If the breast is red, hot and swollen and you are running a fever then you should get to your doctor as soon as possible.  It sounds like your plastic surgeon is following you closely and I would follow his/her recommendations.  Good luck. Dr.Schuster in Boca Raton

Steven Schuster, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

May need further evaluation for mycobacterial infectiion

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I am sorry that you have problem with your surgery. Please make sure that your surgeon is aware of any changes. It is very unusual to have staph infection months post surgery. The common infection that shows months after surgery is mycobacterial infection and you have to do specific culture for that. Please have another board certified plastic surgeon examine you .

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Dealing with possibly Infected Breast Implants

+1

Regarding: "My Breast Augmentation Incision is Infected. What Should I Do?
Its been 6 months since i had my surgery however the incision from the right breast has become infected, there is two small blisters which seem to have pus,cultivation was performed im currently taking antibiotics to fight this bacteria (staph) im not sure if i should i wash the incision?? should i use soap? is there anything i can do to resolve this please help me, my doctor suggested to remove the infected one or both implants eventhough the infection is only in one side, why did this happen
"

Very sorry to hear of your condition. It sounds like your Plastic surgeon has advised you on what needs to be done but you are looking for second opinions online.

Not all infections in augmented breasts are the same. The main thing to remember is that the breast implant is not a living tissue and because it does not have a blood supply it cannot fight infection once the bacteria reach it. The bacteria set up a layer of film against the implant which is impossible to eradicate because antibiotics do not reach it. The result is an ongoing infection. In milder cases, the infection causes a rapid tight scar formation around the implant trying to seal the bacteria and implant off.

If the infection is superficial (no symptoms of fever, pain or open wound), we try a course of antibiotics. If the implant is exposed, it needs to come out. The in between cases are the ones which are harder to call but unfortunately it is uncommon that implants are not involved if there is redness and drainage despite antibiotics.

I would do what your surgeon suggests or get a second opinion.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Breast implants and infection: not a good pair

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I'm sorry you've having this problem, which is something that can happen from time to time after any implant surgery.  It sounds like your surgeon is working with you to treat this infection, so I would recommend that you take her direction.  You may need to have your implant removed, at least on that one side, for a few months.  That will allow the infection to resolve (with antibiotics, too, of course).  After a few months, you should be able to have a new implant placed.  You don't need both implants removed unless the other side is also having problems (infection, capsular contracture, for instance).

Infections that happen 6 months after surgery are generally because you had some other infection in your body and the implant got 'seeded' by bacteria.  You might have had a sinus infection or a urinary infection, for instance, which triggered this whole thing. Or it could be something as simple as having dental work done, which releases bacteria into the bloodstream.  You may never know exactly what caused it.

Hope this helps--best wishes!

Carmen Kavali, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.