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In An Otoplasty Surgery, Can The Frontal Part of the Helix Be Moved Closer to the Head?

I'm Spanish so excuse my speech. I have prominent ears and I don't like the frontal upper part of the ear, the origin of the helix because it's too big and visible. He says the surgery consists in a posterior incision behind the ear making the ears nearer to the head but the frontal part is never ever operated and will look a little strange anyway. Is it possible to come closer the frontral part of the helix to the head? I prefer to hide a little scar to see it as is now.

Doctor Answers (4)

Changing shape of ear

+1

Otoplasty is a complex three dimensional reshape of the ear.  Various portions of the ears can be re positioned based on your aesthetic concerns.  There are limitations and risks with any procedure so seek advice from an experienced otoplasty surgeon.


Chicago Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 67 reviews

Otoplasty can Move Ear Helix Closer to your Head

+1

Otoplasty can move ear helix closer to your head.

There are a variety of otoplasty techniques that can be used to correct specific concerns with the shape and position of your ear helix and other ear structures.

I suggest that you consult a board certified plastic surgeon who can advise you on your treatment options.

Fredrick A. Valauri, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon

Otoplasty

+1

Your helical root is your great concern to you and this portion of your pinna (external ear) can be manipulated without noticeable surgical scars from frontal view.  Please contact an experienced Cosmetic Surgeon for further details.

Robert Shumway, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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In An Otoplasty Surgery, Can The Frontal Part of the Helix Be Moved Closer to the Head?

+1

I am a little confused about your question. In general, an otoplasty with an incision hidden on the back of the ear brings the entire ear closer to the head and can provide a more refined shape to the ear itself. This should include what you refer to as the frontal part of the helix. I hope this information is helpful.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.