Do implants look smaller dual-plane versus subglandular?

I had 360cc teardrop natrelle implants changed from the subglandular to dual plane pocket. They seem a lot smaller but they are still riding high-I also still have loose breast tissue. I am 1 month post op. Will they always look smaller then they did subglandularly? Should I have gone a bit bigger to maintain the same size? Thanks.

Doctor Answers (7)

BBA

+1
They may seem smaller when they are placed under the muscle.  Without seeing photos it is hard to comment, however.  Be sure to discuss your concerns with your PS.


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Implant volume and pocket

+1

Implants placed in different pockets should not look significantly different in terms of volume.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Discuss your goals with your surgeon

+1

Hi there-

Without knowing a lot more about your starting anatomy, the details of the surgery performed, and your current examination, it isn't possible, ethical, or responsible for me to guess what might be making you look the way you do, or whether that particular detail of how your surgery was done is the cause...

I would advise you to discuss your outcome and goals with your surgeon. It may be that your goal will be more closely approximated in time, or that a revision is necessary to get you there- but only your surgeon is in a position to say...

Only if you have completed the recovery period and your surgeon has told you there is nothing more they can do to help you get closer to your goal would I then consider options offered by others.

Armando Soto, MD, FACS
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 98 reviews

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Do breast implants look bigger or smaller with the dual plane breast augmentation?

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If you change the position of breast implants from one plane to another, they may appear smaller or larger depending on the tightness of the capsule. Loosening up the breast pocket, even a little, will give them a softer and slightly smaller look.

Gregory Diehl, MD, FACS
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One-month after surgery, woman expresses concern about implant size decision

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Thank you for your question and the opportunity to respond. I know that one month past your surgery it's probably a bit disconcerting to be rethinking your implant size decision. Let me offer a perspective. In my experience, the appearance/perception of the implant does change in a woman who has had a sub-glandular breast implant for a number of years. Although not smaller, per se, the sub-glandular placement may look more natural, more inconspicuous.

I'll note also that many plastic surgeons recommend dual plane to alleviate breast sag (or ptosis) and possibly avoid a lift. My recommendation to you is this. You are only a month out of surgery. You are still healing. If, after two months, your appearance has not appreciably changed to your satisfaction, it would be a good time to engage one-on-one with your surgeon.

Peter J. Capizzi, MD
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Breast Augment

+1

This is a very interesting case, I wonder what the thinking was to move the implants under the muscle? I personally dont think the same implants under the muscle would look much smaller as the same volume is still under the breast. The question you have to ask is do you like the way your breasts look or not, of not you need to speak to your PS

Ryan Neinstein, MD, FRCSC
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They look the same size

+1

They look the same size no matter which plane they are placed in. The volume of the implant and your natural breast size are the sole determinants of the final volume. Remember a 300cc implant will look bigger on someone 5'1'' than it does on someone 5'10''

Robert Graper, MD
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.