Implants Not Right Size, Was Hoping to be B Cup but am a D Cup, What Should I do?

I had repeatedly told the dr I wanted to be a small 34B and did not want others to assume I had breast augmentation via armpit.I wanted the Dr.'s expertise on which size would be right. Please note my right breast was naturally smaller than the left. He said that I should have 2.25CC right and 2.00CC left. I even came to his office a 2nd time before the surgery to be assured the sizes were right. I now am a 34D and the left breast is still lgr. Is the Dr. to correct for free? This is upsetting.

Doctor Answers (9)

BBA

+1

There is no way to guarantee a particular bra size. Bra sizing varies greatly between bra manufacturers and a C in one bra will be a D in another. What matters more than the assigned bra size is the way the implant looks on you. The best option for your body and aesthetic goals can be determined in a thorough implant sizing session.

Implant sizing depends on several factors. One of the most important factors is your breast width. Generally, your surgeon will measure your breast width, and then provide you with a range of implant sizes appropriate for your native breast size. There are more nuances to it than just what I've described, but this approach works for most women.

I usually have my patients bring in a large bra and a tight t-shirt to do sizing. I'll then choose 3-4 implants that I feel are appropriate, and have my patients place them in the bra under the tight t-shirt. My patients can then look in the mirror and get a good sense of what they will look like with the provided implant sizes. My patients like this approach and get a great idea of how they will look.

By using this technique, your surgeon can outline a range of appropriate implant sizes that will be aesthetically pleasing, and you make the final decision.

I hope this helps. Good luck!

Sincerely,


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Too large????

+1

In your history, you state you wanted to be a small 34 B.  Therefore, I assume you started out as a 34 A.  At size 34 each 200 cc implant is 1 bra size change.  It is impossible for a 225 cc or 200 cc implant to change you from something smaller than a B to a D.  Most likely you are having problems fitting the bras based on the manufacturer not on the size of the implants.  In my entire career of approximately 25 years, I have never put an implant smaller than 200 cc and that certanily did not result in the patient being too large.

Best of Luck,

Gary Horndeski, M.D.

Gary M. Horndeski, MD
Texas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 125 reviews

Breast Implants Not “Right Size”?

+1

Thank you for the question.

Your description of the change in breast cup size resulting from relatively small breast implants is a good example of how imprecise the correlation between breast implant size and resulting bra cup size can be.  Keep in mind, that your satisfaction with the results of surgery should not be based on a specific cup size. I would suggest that you wait at least 6 months before evaluating the end results of surgery to determine how you like the  size/shape/symmetry of the breasts and whether further surgery will be necessary.

In the mean time continue to follow-up with your plastic surgeon. Given your situation, I would suggest that you communicate your concerns in a calm, non-accusatory fashion with your plastic surgeon who is in the best position to help you achieve your goals.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 720 reviews

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Choosing implants

+1

Choosing the right implants for a patient is usually a combined effort betweenthe patient and doctor.  The implants you chose are not large but it depends upon your original breast volume to begin with.  I chose voluem of impalnts with patients not a cup size because cup size varies among bra manufacturers..

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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Patient unhappy with breast size following surgery

+1

It is very difficult to answer your questions without knowing more information. The implant sizes are small, but it also depends on your breast width and the amount of breast tissue you had originally. Talk to your surgeon about the issue.

Donna Rich, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Correcting wrong implant size

+1

The mistake that many patients and plastic surgeons make is focusing on the cup size and the size of the implants. In my opinion they should focus on the look they are trying to achieve. If you currently like the way you look but the cup size is not what you "wanted" don't do anything. If you are the cup size you wanted to be but don't like the look then the cup size didn't matter. 

The implants that you have in place are not large, they are on the smaller size of what is generally placed. I would recommend keeping these implants in for at least 3 months before you consider making a change

John P. Stratis, MD
Harrisburg Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Implants Too Big

+1

It is not good for you or your surgeon if you are unhappy and I think if you speak with him he will be happy to help you out at a reduced fee. Breast surgery is not designed to create a bra size and at our office patients sign a form to the effect that no size bra fit can be guaranteed. Surgery creates a look. Bra sizes vary with the manufacturer. But to answer your question more completely would require more info with your height, weight and before and after photos and how far post op you are. I don't think I have ever used such small implants and wound up with a D result.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Getting the breast size you want

+1

Getting the breast size you want depends on excellent communication between you and your surgeon. You have to show him what you want to avoid issues of too big or too small. Deciding on a number only confuses the process. We do find it hard to believe that the 225 cc implants have given you a D-cup. You may be able to come to some sort of an agreement with your surgeon, though free is hard to come by.

Best of luck, Peter Johnson, MD

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Getting the size you want.

+1

It's hard to answer this question specifically without knowing how far out you are from surgery, what you're starting situation was, and what your interaction was with your surgeon was like. If you are early in the healing process I would give it time because implants tend to change their shape dramatically as the tissues of the body settle over time. The implant volumes that you describe are not terribly large but the ultimate cup size will also depend upon how much natural breast tissue you had from the beginning.

Without knowing you or your surgeon I can still be almost certain that your Physician would want you to be unhappy.  Most situations such as yours, are from an honest miscommunication or misunderstanding.

Many surgeons have a specifically written out touch up or adjustment policy.  You may want to review the literature your surgeon gave you as you may find it there.

In my own practice I never commit to a specific cup size.  I find that going by cup size is terribly inaccurate. Manufacturers seem to cut their Bras very differently.  Victoria's secret for example seems to cut their Bras smaller making people think that they are more voluptuous.

I like to have my patients involved in the decision-making process.  They look at and try on implants and the office.  I find that when patients are a part of the decision-making process they are usually  more satisfied with their choice.

I hope that you and your surgeon can work out something that is mutually agreeable.

Best wishes

 

 

 

 

 

Adam Tattelbaum, MD
Washington DC Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.