My Implants Have Dropped and Separated. Is This my Surgeon's Fault?

I had breast enlargement about 6 months ago. I went from an A to C cup with saline implants placed under the muscle. They have seemed to bottom out and separate (4 finger gap)and one is now larger than the other. I discussed this with my surgeon who says its because of my muscles and I can achieve the results I want with a second surgery. She will; not charge me but I have to pay for the facility, anesthesia and for the implants. Is this her fault and does this sound fair?

Doctor Answers (6)

Breast augmentation

+1

Without an examination I can not say. but you are out long enough that you will probably see no more improvement. It can be you have capsular contracture, which moved the implants, you can have implants that are too small for your diameter of your breasts, the pockets could need to be modified. There are many possibilities, but without an good examination it is hard to tell.

If uncomfortable with what you are being told, get a second opinion from another board certified plastic surgeon.


Norwalk Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Surgeon meeting you half way after undesireable outcome seems fair

+1

This is a difficult situtation to assess without a consultation. Surgery is not 100% predictable and I believe your surgeon has offered a reasonable option and willingness to improve your outcome.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Breast Revision Fees

+1

No, I would say this is not your surgeons fault. The implants can often times settle down and out because the muscle has pushed them. Your surgeon’s fees for revision surgery are very fair. She is showing willingness to help you by waiving her own fees and charging you fees she cannot control.

Robert N. Young, MD, FACS
San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

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Who pays for Revision Surgery

+1

Regarding:  "My Implants Have Dropped and Separated. Is This my Surgeon's Fault?
I had breast enlargement about 6 months ago. I went from an A to C cup with saline implants placed under the muscle. They have seemed to bottom out and separate (4 finger gap)and one is now larger than the other. I discussed this with my surgeon who says its because of my muscles and I can achieve the results I want with a second surgery. She will; not charge me but I have to pay for the facility, anesthesia and for the implants. Is this her fault and does this sound fair
?"

Without examining you, much less seeing your before and after photographs it is impossible to answer your question. By sharing the financial burden of revising your breast surgery result your surgeon has demonstrated that she wants to help you. This is more than being fair in my opinion.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Breast Implant Revision

+1

This sounds very fair. Gravitational factors beyond a surgeon's control can affect results. Poor skin tone, preexisting sagging, too large of a size, a sloping chest wall, and a patient's non compliance with bra support can result in bottoming out (lateral displacement) or sagging. This can often be predicted ahead of time, based on anatomic factors. My revision policy is the same as your surgeon's. There are outside costs we cannot control, therefore these costs are your financial responsibility. I discuss my complication and revision policy with every patient before performing these elective procedures. If you maintain a good relationship with your doctor, I am sure she will do everything possible to make sure you have a satisfactory result. 

Hayley Brown, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Difficult To Assess Without All the Information

+1

Unfortunately, in your situation, it is hard to know exactly why your results did not turn out the way you had anticipated.  Without seeing your pre-and post op photos, knowing what went on during surgery, etc., it is impossible to tell.  Sometimes the muscle pulls the implants over to the sides more.  Sometimes the implants cannot get any closer because this is exactly where the muscle stops, and to weaken it would cause the potential for symmastia.  The implants might be too narrow, or your own breast tissue may be pulling too much.  There are so many variables, that it is impossible to know whether it was from something done during surgery or just the way your body want to heal.  With regards to cost, each surgeon has there own revision policy, and should be clear up front what those costs could be.

Christopher V. Pelletiere, MD
Barrington Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.