Implant Under Muscle Pain

I have had mine for 10 years until a year ago I had no problems now my left one is pulling over to my arm and I have had pain in my ribs. I have had to go to a physical therapist. He also does lymph drain (lot of build up) and he said he noticed a change as he had seen me before and knew about the implants. What could be going on? Encapsulation? How much to redo one implant?

Doctor Answers (6)

Breast implant is falling to side and ending up in armpit: explanation and treatment

+1

IT sounds as if you would benefit from a procedure called lateral capsulorrhaphy. This is essentially using your tissues internally to form and underwire type effect. You may need a medial capsulotomy with muscle release to allow the implant to move to the middle. I occasionally see that this can be due to incomplete release of the pectoralis muscle, or excessive use of the muscle or a laterally inclined chest wall.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Implant problem

+1

Without an exam it is diffiucl to say. Sometimes it is a capsular contracture, and sometimes it is just pulling in the pocket.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Change in breast and symptoms after 10 years

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I agree that this is difficult to advise without an exam but it sounds like a stretched capsule rather than a contracted one. If the capsule stretches out to the side or up toward the armpit (axilla) and the implant pushes on this it can cause stretch or irritation to the nerves coming in around the side of the breast. The isn't serious but can be bothersome and affect the look of the breast as well. I doubt it's anything a physical therapist can help with but it's possible it's coming from the breast and not the implant. 

Consultation with a plastic surgeon experienced with breast augmentation, breast reconstruction, and revisional breast surgery is advised. If available, pictures of the initial result might be helpful. 

Scott L. Replogle, MD
Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

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Implant migration

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This is not that striagnt forward.  You must be seen by a board certified plastic surgeon to evaluate your problem.  It can be implant migration or capsular contracture.

Siamak Agha, MD, PhD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Pain of the breast

+1

Since this is a new symptom, you should see your plastic surgeon for proper examination and diagnosis. It is possible you have capsular contracture, but other possibilities must be ruled out.

The treatment will depend on the findings. In general although your symptoms are only on one side, if you need surgery, do both sides to get the symmetry.

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

New Onset Breast Pain 10 years AFTER Implant

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Regarding: "implant under muscle pain   I have had mine for 10 years until a year ago I had no problems now my left one is pulling over to my arm and I have had pain in my ribs. I have had to go to a physical therapist. He also does lymph drain (lot of build up) and he said he noticed a change as he had seen me before and knew about the implants. What could be going on? Encapsulation? "

No one can adequately diagnose you without an examination much less a photograph. An implant falling to the side means something different than an implant being pulled to the side (probably capsular contracture). A capsular contracture may be associated with pain but not with swelling. That MAY be seen with a delayed infection of the implant.

Your best next step is to see your Plastic surgeon and have him diagnose your problem. The treatment would depend on the diagnosis and COULD involve surgery.

Dr. Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.