Implant Movement?

I had a breast augmentation, and I am now 4weeks post op. Received 375cc silicone HP under the muscle. Recently I noticed that when I lay flat on my back my right implant moves lower...it seems to slide lower than the IMF. The left implants stays in place. When standing they both look fine...but it seems that the crease may be a little less noticeable on right. Should I be worried? Is this a sign of an eventual bottoming ut??? I am not scheduled to see my Dr for a couple of weeks, should I wait or not?

Doctor Answers (8)

Breast Implants and Bottoming Out

+1

    The breasts need to be evaluated by your plastic surgeon.  There is no need to worry in the interim.  Bottoming out tends to occur over a longer period of time.  If this happens, it can be fixed.   


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 237 reviews

Implant position in the early post-op period

+1

is difficult to evaluate, especially without photos.  Assuming your relationship with your surgeon is a good one, please follow up your concerns with the office now instead of waiting for 2 weeks for your schedule appointment.  If there is something concerning, they can have you return sooner and devise a plan to best manage it.  At this point, speculating too, it is probably fine but you do need to follow up with your surgeon.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Implant Movement?

+1

Without photos it is difficult to tell what the situation is despite you description. This question will of course be best addressed to your surgeon, and whenever you feel something isn't right a call is appropriate. Your surgeon can advise whether you should be seen sooner than scheduled. Best wishes

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

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Implant movement 4 weeks after breast augmentation

+1

It is difficult to answer your question based on a description only.  An exam would be necessary to answer best.  In general, 4 weeks is early in your healing process and asymmetry is relatively common.  Speak with your surgeon and be seen earlier if you are concerned.

Naveen Setty, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
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Implant movement 4 weeks post op. Normal?

+1

Difficult to say without an exam.  It is normal for new implant to squeak and move a little due to air and fluid in the pocket.  We also don't know if the surgeon had to make adjustments to your particular anatomy.  Best to call the office and let them know your concerns.

Jeffrey Roth, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Implant issues and movement

+1

I think that an exam is in order. It is difficult to say from jsut a description that you posted.  Fold asymmetry is common.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Breast Implant Displacement after Breast Augmentation?

+1

Given your level of concern, it may be best for you to request earlier than scheduled follow-up with your plastic surgeon. Otherwise, it is doubtful that online consultants will be able to provide you with precise advice and/or meaningful reassurance.  Of course, some breast asymmetry and/or differential breast implant “settling” is to be expected;  whether or not you are experiencing early signs of a breast implant displacement issue can only be determined upon physical examination. Again, earlier than otherwise scheduled follow-up with your plastic surgeon  may be very helpful to you.

 Best wishes.

 

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 794 reviews

Breast implant moving lower when lying down may be normal but asked to see your surgeon

+1

Thank you for your question. Photographs would have helped. It is early following your breast augmentation and your implants will continue to change. If you think the implant is moving below your inframammary fold or the fold beneath your breast you should definitely see your surgeon for an evaluation.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.