Should I Prep my Skin with a Stretch Mark Cream Before Breast Augmentation?

Is it very common for women to end up with stretch marks as a result of BA? I bought Bio Oil and have been using it twice a day..figured it can't hurt to be pro-active. But my surgey is a few weeks away and I don't want to waste my time doing that if it really won't make a difference or it's just not necessary. Advice?

Doctor Answers (16)

Preventing Stretch Marks after Breast Augmentation?

+3

You are correct in that stretch marks do occasionally occur after breast augmentation surgery. However, there is no evidence that “pretreatment” of the skin prior to breast augmentation surgery will be helpful. On the other hand, your time investment doing so will likely be minimal and may give you some peace of mind ( that you have been proactive).

 Best wishes for a successful outcome.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 757 reviews

Stretch marks

+2

I have had a few cases where patients developed stretch marks following breast implants.  In those cases, the patients experienced only a few stretch marks, but they were disconcerting nonetheless.  You are right that there will probably be no harm I using cream to try to prevent them, but there is no evidence that it works.  Just make sure it is okay with your surgeon.  the risk of getting stretch marks overall from the procedure is quite low.

Ronald J. Edelson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Skin treatment against possible stretch marks to come after BA

+2

Hello.

Thank you for an interesting inquiry.

Unfortunately, there is not direct correlation between pre-op skin treatment for stretch marks and their post-op formation after breast augmentations.

Normally, post-op stretch marks attributed to breast augmentations are rare and if they tend to happen they will be mostly attributed to a skin with limited elasticity and/or extra large implants used during surgery.

However, I believe that consulting with your dermatologist concerning the Bio Oil you are using may be helpful.

I hope this helps and the best of luck to you.

Ali Sajjadian, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 120 reviews

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Stretch Marks with Breast Augmentation

+2

It is uncommon, although not unheard of, to get stretch marks from a breast augmentation. If you notice stretch marks after surgery it is usually an amplification of stretch marks that were there previously.

With regard to creams, I am not aware of any good evidence to suggest that any pre-treatment works to prevent the development of stretch marks. That being said, hydration is a key part of good skin care. At a minimum, your skin will feel and look better.

I think this is a case of "no harm, no foul." If the cream is not too expensive, there is nothing to loose, and peace of mind to gain.

Lawrence Iteld, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Stretch Mark Cream Before Breast Augmentation?

+2

Stretch marks usually occur after skin is stretched by weight change, pregnancy, and occasionally after breast augmentation. It is hard to imagine that your remedy will do any harm, but there is really no evidence that any of the products available are useful preventatives. 

Best of luck with your upcoming surgery.

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Stretch marks

+1

Stretch marks are uncommon in our experience - particularly if the implants are placed behind the muscle and are not super-large compared to the space available.  Fewer than 5% of patients get new stretch marks.  It makes sense to ensure that the skin is moisturized prior to surgery - but I haven't seen any scientific studies that show that pre-treatment reduces stretch marks.  Best of luck!

Thomas Fiala, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Breast Augmentation and Stretch Marks

+1

Hi! Thank you for your question.

 

Stretch marks are one of the risks of breast augmentation. Since your breasts will be larger after surgery, your skin will need to stretch to accommodate them.

 

You can apply cocoa or Shea butter to your breasts daily after surgery. Begin doing this as early as possible. The natural butters helps keep skin moisturized, therefore making it less susceptible to stretching and scarring. Dry skin is much more likely to scar from the stretching process.

 

After your breasts have fully healed from surgery, you can massage your breasts daily to increase circulation, allowing blood and nutrients to more easily reach the skin, thereby preventing and improving stretch marks.

 

Follow your plastic surgeon's aftercare instructions properly.

 

I have provided a direct link below for additional information as well as a lot of before and after pictures.

 

Thanks for your question and have a great day!

Best regards,

Dr. Speron

 

Sam Speron, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon

No need to stress!

+1

It is very uncommon to get stretch marks on your breasts after a breast augmentation unless the implants are placed above the muscle, a practice that I do not condone.  Make sure your implants are being placed beneath the muscle!!!  Putting anything on your breasts before the surgery probably won't make a difference but do it if it makes you feel better.

Eric Sadeh, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Stretch marks after breast augmentation

+1

There was recently an article in one of our journals that showed a 5% incidence of stretch marks after breast augmentation.  It's not clear if moisturizing will help, but it certainly won't hurt.  Bio-oil is very good, another great choice is Nectifirm by Revision Skincare.  It was developed for the fine skin on the neck, but it works great on other areas too.  Good luck! /nsn

Nina S. Naidu, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Cream

+1

I would not use the cream. It is probably doing nothing for you. I have never seen stretch marks from breast augmentation.

Norman Bakshandeh, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.