Will Icing 1 Breast Make It Drop Faster Than the Other?

5 days post opp and during the surgery my surgeon raised my right breast more than the left and nipple nercrosis was startling on the right so it was left unattached until yesterday. Also had 475 cc silicone implants. I iced the left and did none on the right. My left breast is considerably lower than the right. Is that from icing 1 and not the other. Is there hope she didn't screw up and make them that off. My right implant seems higher than left, but not as much as I can see on bottom.

Doctor Answers (9)

Post op ice to breast

+1

Applying ice/cool packs to the breast does not affect the positioning of the implant.

Keep in touch with your plastic surgeon.


Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Icing after Breast Implants?

+1

   I typically do not recommend icing after breast augmentation, because there is no evidence to suggest that this improves outcome.

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

Using ice on your breasts should not impact the position of the implant

+1

Hello,

Thank you for the question. I do not see a way that using ice on your breast after surgery would result in the implant descending down further than the other.  Neither ice nor heat would impact the position of the implant.  Implant position asymmetry may be caused by a number of factors some of which are temporary and can improve with additional healing time.  At 5 days after surgery it is still very early so I would definitely give it more time for healing to occur.

All the best,

Dr. Remus Repta

Remus Repta, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 81 reviews

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Symmetry off after breast lift with implants.

+1

Thanks for your post. At 5 days it's wat too early to judge the results as final. In addition, each breast has slightly different anatomy. There's always one that tends to start off higher than the other. Icing helps to reduce pain, but massage of the breasts is important to lower the breast implants. Some surgeons employ a breast band to assist. See what your PS says about it. Overall, it may take as long as 6 months for the implants to fully settle so you need to be patient. Another piece of advise is that you should be more positive about the work your surgeon has put in for your case. Having a positive attitude leads to better communication between you and your surgeon - and in the long run - that will be very important for a successful outcome. Best wishes, Dr. Aldo.

Aldo Guerra, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 122 reviews

Icing

+1

So you had a breast lift (mastopexy) with implants.  I'm sorry to hear your are having issues with the circulation on one nipple.  It's important to keep in close communication with your surgeon, and report any changes you see in the color or circulation.

In terms of the ice, it has no connection at all with the breast asymmetry.  Delayed closure of the incision is a time-honored approach in cases where there are some circulation concerns.  The incision can be re-sutured once there is less swelling, so there is less tension on the closure, and hopefully the circulation is less affected.  The final scar is usually very good.

Thomas Fiala, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Icing Not Related to Breast Asymmetry.

+1

Your asymmetry is most likely not secondary to icing on one side only.  While this may have helped for comfort reasons and reduced your swelling slightly, it is not likely to affect breast shape and implant position.  Certainly, delayed closure of the areolar incision will have an impact on the breast shape and symmetry.  It may also make the implant position appear asymmetric.  Since you are having a harder recovery than is usually the case, you will need to stay in contact with your surgeon and address your concerns directly.  If you or anyone in your family is a smoker, you absolutely need to avoid cigarette smoke.  The carbon monoxide and nicotine in cigarette smoke will definately affect nipple/areolar blood supply, healing and your chance of an infection.  Good luck with your recovery.

Robert F. Centeno, MD, FACS
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Hello

+1

The placement of your implants have nothing to do with the icing. Your only 5 days post surgery it takes time for your implants to fall into place. In our practice we give our patients a breast band stabilizer to help push the implants down into position. You should address your concern with your PS .

Stuart B. Kincaid, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Concerns about Breast Asymmetry after Breast Surgery?

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I'm sorry to hear about the concerns you have had after breast surgery. I do not think that any degree of icing has changed your surgical result in the past  or will change the positioning of your breast implants in the future.

 Based on your question, it is clear that you have had surgery relatively recently;   at this point, some breast implant and breast asymmetry is to be expected. Hopefully, with ongoing time ( and breast implant “settling”) you will notice improved symmetry.

 Keep close follow-up with your plastic surgeon who may have additional advice for you ( for example massage) that may be helpful at some point in improving breast implant position and breast symmetry.

 Best wishes for the remainder of your recovery.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 681 reviews

Icing after Breast Augmentation

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Unfortunately, icing did not and will not make your breasts settle or drop faster. Discuss your concerns with your Plastic Surgeon. She may have a protocol that she recommends to her patients to help the implants settle. 

Thanks for your question! Best of Luck!

Gregory Park, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.