Can I Have Botox Injections for Wrinkle Therapy with a Pacemaker Fitted?

Doctor Answers (13)

Botox with a pacemaker

+2

Thanks for the question -

Botox works at the neuromuscular junction locally and should cause absolutely no issues with your pacemaker. 

I hope this helps!


San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Yes.

+2

Thanks for your question.

The nature of Botox, the amounts used, and the injection locations restrict its action to only the local muscles for wrinkle therapy. You should have no problem getting Botox if you have a pacemaker and I truly would not worry. Definitely let your physician know that you have a pacemaker as that is a valuable part of your past medical history, but in regards to Botox, there is no known risk of pacemaker malfunction or heart rhythm disruption through cosmetic use.

Hope this helps!

Don Mehrabi, MD
Beverly Hills Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

As they say in the trade...no problem...don't worry about it...

+1

botox for cosmetic purposes will not impact on your pacemaker or whatever underlying heart disease caused you to need the pacemaker...fortunately the effects will be limited to the facial muscles where the treatment is directed...remember botox doesn't even have an effect on the muscles even an inch away let alone all the way down to your chest...

Ken Landow, MD
Las Vegas Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

You might also like...

Safe to receive Botox, but discuss it with your cardiologist

+1

There should be no problems receiving Botox with a pacemaker in place. To be absolutely safe, I would advise you to discuss this with your cardiologist.

I hope you find this helpful.

Stephen A. Goldstein, MD
Englewood Plastic Surgeon

Botox is not known to effect cardiac electrical conduction

+1

This is not known to effect the electrical conduciton of the AV node and so it is highly unlikely that Botox could alter cardiac function.

 

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Safe to get Botox

+1

I agree with the others. Botox's effect is at the neuro-muscular junction and should not interfere with the electrical impulse of the pacemaker. In addition Botox's effects are local to the muscle(s) it is injected into. I agree with Dr. Kasdan, that it would be wise to tell your plastic surgeon that you have a pacemaker before the procedure (or any procedure). Good luck.

Arnold R. Oppenheim, MD
Virginia Beach Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Absolutely can have Botox

+1

Botox is an excellent way to safely reduce wrinkles without surgery. As you know Botox is a protein that softens wrinkles by blocking the movement of the muscles that cause the wrinkles in the first place. It has no impact on your pacemaker.

As long as your medical doctor deems it safe for you to undergo an injection, then it would be safe for you to get Botox.

Always inform your plastic surgeon of all your medical conditions prior to undergoing any treatment.

Good luck with your procedure.

A. Peter Salas, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Be still my heart?

+1

Chris,

Botox works locally only and will have absolutely no effect on, or interaction with your pacemaker.  You may proceed with impunity to correct your wrinkles.  Good luck!

Kenneth R. Francis, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Botox will not affect the pacemaker

+1

You will be fine, Botox will not affect the pacemaker. Botox works by paralyzing the underlying muscles which helps reduce the dynamic wrinkles of the overlying skin. There is no effect on the pacemaker or your heart tissue.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

OK to have Botox with pacemaker fitted

+1

I currently have patients in my practice with pacemakers whom I administer Botox to without reservation. I think Botox is one of the best things since sliced bread and get it myself in between my eyebrows.

Darrick E. Antell, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.