I Have Bad Scarring Issues... Can I Have Gynecomastia Surgery? (photo)

As I have asked in another question, I have bad scarring issues. You can see from my photos that I have both raised and lowered scars, with a shiny aspect (I believe they're keloids). If I go through a gynecomastia surgery, will i get more of these awful scars?

Doctor Answers (6)

Scarring Issues. Can I Have Gynecomasti Surgery?

+1

The scars you showed do not mean that your gynecomastia scars will look bad.

Assuming you have the typical gynecomastia surgery, where the entire operation is done through a 2 cm. incision at the lower border of the areola, the scars should be hardly visible.  The nose scar looks like tissue was removed and not replaced with tissue of similar thickness or color, or perhaps it was from trauma and has not been repaired.  The arm scar is unfortunately hypertrophic, not a keloid, from the photo. That is, it is raised and red, but does not grow outside of its boundaries, which is what a keloid does.

It is possible that you could get scar hypertrophy, but that is rather uncommon for a male gynecomastia patient.  Now, if you were going to have an operation in which an incision was going to made more extensively on the chest, or below the areola, there would be reason for some concern, since those kinds of incisions are inherently at higher risk of scar hypertrophy.


Mountain View Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Bad Scarring Issues... Can I Have Gynecomastia Surgery

+1

Neither of these photos demonstrate keloids. Without knowing how these came about it is hard to use them as predictors of future scarring.
Some gynecomastia surgery can be done with liposuction alone, sometimes an incision is needed around the pigmented tissue of the areola.
A meeting with a plastic surgeon who can look at these scars and at your chest is the best way to get the advice you are seeking. When you are ready for an in person consultation, RealSelf has listings of surgeons in your area. You should consider cross referencing the listings from the The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (plasticsurgery dot org). A listing in the ASPS website assures you that your surgeon is not only board certified,  but also is a member in good standing of the major plastic surgery organization in the U. S. Thank you for your question, best wishes.

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Gynecomastia Scars

+1

   Sometimes the fat and breast tissue can be removed with solely liposuction allowing for even smaller incisions.  Traumatic wounds almost always heal worse than surgical incisions. 

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 204 reviews

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Bad scars

+1

The scars in the photos you have shown are not keloids. The arm scar is wide but flat. Keloid scars are thick and raised. Based on the scars you have shown I would not hesitate to have gynecomastia surgery but make sure you show your scars to you surgeon at the time of your consultation. Good luck.

Ronald Schuster, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Gynecomastia and scars

+1

Some scars spread like on your arm and some pucker like on your nose. As for your chest scars it is difficult to predict, but most do well.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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Scars after Gynecomastia Surgery?

+1

Thank you for the question and pictures.

 As you can imagine, it is not possible to give you precise device without direct examination or viewing pictures of your chests.

 Generally speaking,  you should be aware that (despite knowing your previous history of scarring) it is not possible to accurately predict exactly how you will heal with chest surgery.  There are many factors involved including  anatomic location and surgeon skills that come into play.

 Your best bet is to meet with board certified plastic surgeons who can demonstrate the types of results you are looking for helping patients similar to yourself.  Then, after viewing lots of before/after pictures and potentially meeting with similar patients, you can come to an  educated decision whether or not to proceed with surgery.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 724 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.