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Huge Bumps Each Side of my Nose. I Suspect That It's Because I Have Broken my Nose Several Years Ago when I Was a Child?

My nose have two huge bumps each side of it, they looks like balls, they are very solid and stretch my nose wider. I have typed "nose bone" on the web and this bump does not exist on a normal nose. What is that and how to remove or reduce it? I have added a schema explanation. Thank you in advance for you help and answers. :)

Doctor Answers (3)

Huge Bumps Each Side of my Nose. I Suspect That It's Because I Have Broken my Nose Several Years Ago when I Was a Child?

+1

These issues most likely can be addressed with a closed rhinoplasty.

Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of rhinoplasties and rhinoplasty revisions each year. Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 237 reviews

Rhinoplasty for large bumps on the side of the nose

+1
Large bumps on the side of the nose are usually related to nasal trauma where the junction of the bone and cartilage comes together. Shaving down cartilage and filing down bone in this area will help alleviate the bump. Medial and lateral osteotomies will also be required on the nasal bones in this area. 

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Nasal Bone Irregularities

+1

If the bumps on either side of the nose are firm, they may represent broken nasal bones that healed in an irregular fashion. I couldn't say for sure without seeing and/or feeling them. A rhinoplasty would be able to address this concern.

The nasal bones would likely be broken during the surgery in such a manner to reestablish an improved nasal contour.

Ashley B. Robey, MD
Indianapolis Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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