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How Soon Can Fly Long Haul After Breast Enlargement?

Doctor Answers 13

Wait at least 2 weeks-- discuss travel plans with your PS prior!

Travel of any type following cosmetic surgery can potentially complicate the postoperative course.In most cases, patients have recovered sufficiently to travel in about two weeks following breast augmentation surgery.
Air travel often involves prolonged periods of immobilization and, because of this, patients may be at risk for the development of blood clots in their extremities.These blood clots, known as DVTs, can potentially represent a life-threatening phenomena when they occur.
There are several risk factors associated with the development of DVTs.These include the length of the surgical procedure, use of hormonal replacements or birth control pills, cigarette smoking, obesity, a history of cancer, family history of hyper-coagulability, advanced age, and a previous history of blood clots.
When travel is necessary following cosmetic surgery, every step should be taken to avoid this potential complication.Patients should use anti-embolic compression stockings, maintain hydration, and ambulate frequently when traveling.In patients who have multiple risk factors, anticoagulants such as Lovenox, may be necessary.
If you have plans for travel in the immediate postoperative period, make sure you discuss this issue with your plastic surgeon.It’s important to remember that every patient’s situation is unique.For this reason, treatment needs to be individualized for every patient.

Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 142 reviews

8900 West Dodge Road
Omaha, NE 68114

Flying after cosmetic surgery

I would recommend waiting at least two weeks after any breast enlargement surgery before flying. Make sure you can get up and walk around without much pain so that you can do this on the airplane. This will help to prevent any blood clots from forming in your legs. Also, if you have any complications, they'll usually happen within the first two weeks. Good luck!

Jeffrey E. Schreiber, MD, FACS
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 123 reviews

10807 Falls Rd
Lutherville-Timonium, MD 21093

Frequent walks and good hydration can help avoid problems.

There is no right answer for this question. The best advice is to avoid prolonged sitting with your knees bent a 90 degrees. The best position for flexing of the knee is approximately a 5 degree angle. It is important to take frequent walks and to stay well hydrated when flying for long distances.

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

3096 Peachtree Industrial Blvd
Duluth, GA 30097

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Long haul clot

There is no correct answer for this with the information provided. You should ask your board certified plastic surgeon his recommendation. He will know all of the details of your case, your history, medications, anesthetic, blood pressure variations, etcetera. That's your safest bet, particularly since it's a long flight. Above 15000 ft the pressurization of the cabin can cause clots to propagate.

If you have any risk factors, consider delaying the operation until after your flight.

This surgery is low risk but your inquiry begs the question of why you're asking it.

Ricardo A. Meade, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

9101 N. Central Expressway
Dallas, TX 75231

Flying and breast augmentation.


The risk of flying after surgery has to do with developing blood clots in your legs.  But the typical breast augmentation patient has a very low risk of blood clots.  So, for this particular operation, you can fly in a few days.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

875 Park Ave at 78th Street
New York, NY 10075

Flying and surgery

 Flying is ok about a week after surgery.  You want to be healing successfully without any problems.  I tell patients  to stay well hydrated and move around a lot on the plane to avoid developing a clot in their legs.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

1049 Fifth Ave
New York, NY 10028

This is up to your plastic surgeon

I allow patients to travel after surgery as long as I feel they are on the road to healing properly. There is a long converstaion about activity and lifting restrictions as well.

You have to be very aware that if you travel away from your surgeon and there is a problem that they need to see you for, you will need to return which can be a hardship.

All of these details need to be discussed with you plastic surgeon before you make you travel plans.

Dr Edwards

Michael C. Edwards, MD, FACS
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

8530 W Sunset Rd
Las Vegas, NV 89113

Two weeks?

This will really depend on your surgical assessment and type of procedure you undergo. For an uncomplicated breast augmentation, placed under the muscle, I prefer patient's not do anything vigorous such as lifting for about 2 weeks after surgery. My thought on this is that I do not want my patience to do anything that would increase the risk of bleeding. So, my answer to you would be 2 weeks, but that may not be the answer your surgeon gives to you.

Scott E. Kasden, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

2813 W Southlake Blvd
Southlake, TX 76092

Travel is Probably OK After Breast Augmentation

I share the other doctors concerns about you remaining in town for any issues after surgery.

Travel of any form does slightly raise the risk of blood clot, and if you smoke, are on hormones, or have other risk factors a low dose blood thinner may be useful. 

John LoMonaco, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 214 reviews

17226 Mercury Drive
Houston, TX 77058

This is a question only for YOUR OWN surgeon...

This website is great for general information, but when it comes to an issue so specific, patients should rely only on the advice of their own surgeon. Nothing would make me more upset as a surgeon than to have a patient seek anonymous advice on the internet after I operated on them, replacing my advice that is specific for their situation by some generic advice by someone who hadn't met them.

Only your surgeon knows what he or she did; what your tissues were like; how bloodly things were; what their normal recovery pattern is with their techniques, etc. Ask your surgeon this question, and heed their advice!

Steven Teitelbaum, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

1301 20th St
Santa Monica, CA 90404

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.