Horse Riding After Rhinoplasty?

I am getting a nose job but I also horse ride. How long should I wait before going back to horse riding after I have had a nose job? Thank you.

Doctor Answers (8)

Horseback riding okay a month after rhinoplasty

+2

Refrain from horseback riding for at least two weeks following rhinoplasty surgery. Take all precautions to not fall off the horse for at least a month after the rhinoplasty surgery so as not to re-break your nose.  Listen to your body and talk to your surgeon. 


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Noses take about 6 weeks to strengthen after rhinoplasty

+2

I tell my patients that it takes about 6 weeks before the nose can take any kind of direct trauma. This is how long it takes bones to heal. If you or anyone you know has broken a bone, casts and splints are left on for 6 to 8 weeks. This is not practical for a nose. So, being careful can do the trick. In my opinion, any sports, including horseback riding, where you can get hit in the nose should therefore be avoided for that period of time. Non-contact sports are OK after three weeks.

Steven J. Pearlman, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Horseback riding after rhinoplasty.

+2

 Since I ride horses and know the variability of horses, it really depends on the horse and how good the rider is. I had my nose broken making green horses 3 times last year during polo games. If you are a good rider and know the horse well, 3-4 weeks is fine.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Rhinoplasty

+2

Hi,

You want to wait at least a month. Some surgeons would say 3 to 6 months. As long as you are a good rider and are pretty confident you won't fall off, I believe a month is adequate time.

Best,

Dr. S.

Oleh Slupchynskyj, MD, FACS
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 209 reviews

Horseback Riding after Rhinoplasty

+1

The answer depends on the horse, the skill of the rider, and what you're doing on the horse. If you're playing polo with significant risk of trauma, wait about 6 weeks. For most other disciplines 2-3 weeks should be adequate.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

3 months before any direct impact after rhinoplasty

+1

Whether it is horseback riding, kick-boxing, or basketball, the nose should not experience a significant blunt trauma for at least 3 months after rhinoplasty. Only you can assess how likely this would be to happen based on your experience with your horse and the type of riding you intend to do. If in doubt, wait it out!

David W. Kim, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Nose job activity restrictions: Low impact activity after 3 weeks and full activity after 6 weeks.

+1

It really depends on the type of horse back riding you plan on doing. A gentle ride is possible at 3 weeks but a full gallop over rough terrain may not be recommended for at least 6 weeks due to the jarring of the nose.

The extent of the rhinoplasty will also have and effect on postoperative restrictions. Activity resstrictions for a tip rhinoplasty may be dramatically different from a septal reconstruction with rib graft.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Ride Horses in 3 weeks after Rhinoplasty

+1

After 3 weeks you will feel good enough to ride horses again. If you are a good rider and you know your horse, then 3 weeks is enough. If you are a beginner and the horse is not well trained then wait for about two months to let the bones completely mature.

The biggest risk is fall from the horse or the horse bucking into your face. In either case if you get hit you can break your nose even months after a rhinoplasty.

In essence start riding as soon as you feel strong enough to ride but ride carefully.

Regards

Tanveer Janjua, MD
Bedminster Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.