Implant Held Up by 2 Large Veins in Chest?

330 saline implants unders and breast lift performed June 2012. I repeatedly went back stating I felt pain, stiffness, felt something was wrong. In Dec. the Dr stated I had a contracture I under went surgery Feb 14, 2013 and he stated he found the implant held up by two large veins. The implant was not incapsulated - It freely moved left, right and up just not down. Is this a misposition of the implant, should the dr have changed my diagnosis in my chart to state no contracture and what he found

Doctor Answers (5)

Pre Op Diagnosis vs. Surgerical Diagnosis

+1

Hi! Thank you for your question,

I am Dr. Speron, a proud member of both the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) and the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (ASAPS).  I am also certified with the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

Preoperative diagnosis is sometimes going to be different than what expected during a surgical procedure. Since the patient charts cannot be changed, the pre operative diagnosis is going to stay as is in writing. On the other hand, your doctor will write the actual diagnosis after the surgery. If you are still concerned, I advise you to request a copy of your operative report from your plastic surgeon. 


There are some links below for additional information and before and after pictures.

If you have any further questions, please feel free to call us at 847.696.9900.

Best of luck and have a great day!
 

Regards,


Dr. Speron


Chicago Plastic Surgeon

Clinical diagnosis and intraoperative findings

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Sometimes the clinical assumption is incorrect and the surgical diagnosis intraoperatively discovers something else. Better than being a true capsule.  It is like hearing a "ding" in a car engine and when you lift the hood it is caused by something else.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Findings at surgery differ from preoperative diagnosis

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On occasion what surgeons think is causing something preoperatively, may actually be the result of something else. Patient charts are a legal document that cannot be altered once an entry is made. Therefore, your surgeon cannot change your preoperative diagnosis in your chart. However, your surgeon can now document the actual cause of your breast implant malposition in your future followup entries. Hope this helps. Thank you for your question. Best wishes.

Gregory Park, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

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Breast Implant Encapsulation or Breast Implant Malposition?

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Good for you and the "prognosis" of soft breasts in the future,  that breast implant encapsulation was not found.  In regards to charting, if you have concerns ask your plastic surgeon for a copy of the operative report for your records.

 Enjoy the outcome of the procedures performed. Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 781 reviews

Implant Held Up by 2 Large Veins in Chest?

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Once something is documented in a medical chart it is not to be altered. I would presume that if your surgeon told you that after surgery the diagnosis was not as expected before surgery, that it was documented as such in the operative report. If you have any question about this it could be clarified by a discussion with your surgeon, and if you so desire, you could ask for a copy of your records to review. 

Without photos I wouldn't comment on possible malposition. Capsular contracture surgery can be done when the implants are firm and well positioned as well as when they are not in ideal position. What you were told is one of several reasons that revisional surgery may be needed, the cause of which is not in the control of the surgeon. 

Best wishes. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.