I Have Had Breast Implants for 15 Years; Experiencing a "Sloshing" When I RuN?

I am extremely active....a personal trainer and all natural bodybuilder. I have, for the last several years experienced, "sloshing" when I run. It is not only bothersome, but has become almost painful. In addition to 2 bras, I am finding that I have to hold my breast so it wont "move". I have since moved from my hometown where I had the breast augmentation and I have been unsuccessful in reaching the original surgeon. Can anyone offer any advice? I hate to undergo another surgery. Thanks!

Doctor Answers 10

"Sloshing" When I RuN?

Usually this phenomenon occurs only with saline implants, except in the first few weeks after surgery when there can be air trapped around the implants. 

Switching to silicone, which is much more viscous would probably be the best solution to this problem. All the best. 

Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

1110 112th Avenue NE
Bellevue, WA 98004

"Sloshing" Breast Implants

This is a not uncommon complaint with Saline Implants immediately after surgery and then again later, years down the road.  At first after surgery, there is air and fluid around the implant.  Patients will say they "hear" and "feel" the implant moving.  Down the road, one of two things can happen.  The breast, capsule and thus the space surrounding the implant can stretch and the implant then moves too much in the pocket.  The second cause is a partial deflation of the implant, usually a slow leak of the valve.  A revision breast surgery can fix this.  Usually, it involves implant replacement with a slightly larger Silicone Gel Implant and sometimes a capsulorrhaphy.  Hope this helps. Good Luck!

Brian K. Reedy, MD
Reading Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

50 Commerce Drive
Reading, PA 19610

Sloshing 15 years after implants

If your implant has been in for 15 years you probably have a saline implant as silicone gel was not available. Sloshing might indicate a slow leak and volume loss, not unexpected after 15 years, and it might be time for a replacement.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

8901 West Golf Road
Des Plaines, IL 60016

Changes with #BreastAugmentation

Your breasts will age as will your implants. Over 15 years there is the risk that you may have a rupture that may be making this feeling more noticeable over time. Additionally, you can have changes in the breast pocket etc. All of this would need to be determined after an in-person visit with a plastic surgeon.

You should see a board certified plastic surgeon in your area to get a formal opinion through and in-person consultation.

Best of luck,

Vincent Marin, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon

Vincent P. Marin, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

1431 Camino Del Mar
Del Mar, CA 92014

Implant integrity

It is difficult without a full exam to determine the nature of your concerns.  You should see a board certified plastic surgeon where you live now to be evaluated.  Sometimes tests such as ultrasound or MRI are need to evaluate the implants so don't be surprised if they recommend one or both of these studies.  It would also help to know if they are saline, silicone or dual chamber implants.  Good luck.

Gary A. Tuma, MD, FACS
Princeton Plastic Surgeon

Two Capital Way
Pennington, NJ 08534

"Sloshing” after Breast Augmentation?

I'm sorry to hear about the problems you are experiencing. Despite best intentions, online consultants will not be able to provide you with a precise enough diagnosis and/or treatment recommendations. My best advice therefore would be to seek consultation with well experienced board-certified plastic surgeons in your area. For example, you may be experiencing an issue with breast implant displacement ( movement);  sometimes breast implant displacement can cause discomfort.  This movement can also (potentially) explain the sounds you are hearing.

 Good medical advice would require an accurate diagnosis which can only be made after careful history and physical examination.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1,051 reviews

8851 Center Drive
San Diego, CA 91942

Sloshing When I Run

Thank you for the question. This is a more common phenomena within the forst few weeks after the augmentation, as there is an air fluid level that surrounds the implant secondary to the surgery. You may require surgical intervention, but at this point I would suggest you see a plastic surgeon for an in-person evaluation.

Good luck.

Pedro M. Soler, Jr., MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

4144 North Armenia Ave
Tampa, FL 33607

15 year old Saline Breast Implants

This can happen with saline breast implants.  If you are otherwise happy with your shape and size, you can have a minor operation to simply change out your implants to silicone.  This operation is outpatient (you go home the same day), takes less than an hour, and can be done under IV sedation (twilight sleep).  This would be the least invasive way to change the sound you hear.  Good Luck!

K. Roxanne Grawe, MD
Columbus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

10330 Sawmill Pkwy
Powell, OH 43065

Saline Breast Implants at 15 Years and Sloshing

    If the breasts remain the same size, the possibility of leak is small.  The air within the implant could be the issue and could be producing this.  Sometimes air and fluid around the implant can cause noise as well.  A surgery may be the only thing to fix the sloshing, but an exam would be needed to verify this.

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 334 reviews

435 North Roxbury Drive
Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Sloshing with implants

The sloshing you may be feeling is the saline implant. Silicone implants do not  slosh around.  You may want to switch.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

1049 Fifth Ave
New York, NY 10028

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.