1 Weeks Post Revision Rhinoplasty. When Can I Expect the Swelling to Go Down?

I had a revision rhinoplasty done one week ago. I did not have any work done on the tip. My nose was wide and was moved inwards. Since having the cast off, it has swollen. I was just wondering how long it takes for most of the initial swelling to go. I am getting married in two months and I was wondering if it would go down by then?? or what percentage would go down?? Thank you

Doctor Answers (3)

Swelling after revision rhinoplasty

+2

Thank you for your question. Revision rhinoplasty is more complex of a procedure than primary rhinoplasty and tends to swell longer. The swelling also depends on whether you had open or closed rhinoplasty. I am sure your plastic surgeon must have discussed that issue with you especially when you are getting married in two months. The good news is the swelling will go down significantly in two months. Nine the less you should communicate your concern with your plastic surgeon.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Revision rhinoplasty and swelling

+2

Swelling after a rhinoplasty will worsen initially after the splint is removed but will come down over the next few months. By two months it may look ok.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Swelling following revision rhinoplasty

+1

Depending on the nature of your surgery, it can take up to one year to see the final result.  The amount of time it takes to see the final outcome is influenced by the following:

 

1) Whether or not tip work was performed during your surgery
2) The thickness of your skin. 
3) Whether or not osteotomies (fracturing of the nasal bones) were performed.

In general, about 70% of the swelling goes down after the first 3 months, and the remainder will go down over time.  Thanks and I hope this helps!

Jonathan Kulbersh, MD
Charlotte Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

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