Will Health Insurance Cover Fixing Previous Rhinoplasty if It is Crooked and I Cant Breathe? (photo)

My daughter had a nose job last June. She is have difficulty breathing and it is crooked. Will our health insurance cover fixing it? We did not go through any insurance the first time.

Doctor Answers (8)

Insurance Coverage

+2

Hi,

It all depends on what kind of insurance plan you have and what the surgeon tells the insurance company. Some insurances are more difficult to work with than others. If she has a real functional issue, then insurance should cover a 2nd procedure.

Best,

Dr.S.


New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 209 reviews

Functional rhinoplasty

+2

Typically the functional aspects (to correct breathing) will be covered by insurance, though to a variable degree based on insurance carrier and the procedure codes being billed by the provider.  Collapse of your daughter's nasal valve on the left is contributing to her "crooked" appearance.  Since the nasal valve collapse is contributing to her breathing problems, most insurances will cover the repair.  As a secondary benefit of internal nasal valve repair, the appearance of her nose will also improve.  

Donald B. Yoo, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Insurance

+1

You can certainly try. I can only tell you that my experience as a practitioner and as a person reviewing my own personal health insurance policy specifically states that any surgery or medical treatment done to correct a problem that is a result of cosmetic surgery is not covered regardless of the problem. Good luck.

Michael L. Schwartz, MD
West Palm Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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Insurance and nose surgery

+1

It depends what the surgeon intends to do, It does not hurt to ask, but I am skeptical because these days insurances are very carefull and investigate the issues well. They do not cover complications of cosmetic procedures but cover complications of driving under the influence or doing other illegal activities. Go figure!.

M. Vincent Makhlouf, MD, FACS
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Rhinoplasty revision and insurance

+1

Insurance companies often will not cover airway problems. On occasion they will, but if it is secondary to cosmetic surgery, they probably will not. You will have to check on your own.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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Insurance should cover treatment of nasal blockage even if you had prior surgery

+1

If proper tests and evaluations are done on you, insurance could cover treatment for nasal obstruction. It may be a devaited septum but in a crooked nose can also be what is called nasal valve collapse.
Unfortunately, insurance almost never covers straightening a crooked nose. That may take many more surgical manuvers than just getting you to breathe better.

Steven J. Pearlman, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Will Health Insurance Cover Fixing Previous Rhinoplasty if It is Crooked and I Cant Breathe?

+1

It depends upon a few factors. Like type of health insurance, if your policy covers complications following cosmetic surgery <now many health insurance companies are eliminating coverage for complications following cosmetic surgery>, will a surgery correct the issue that are functional but not cosmetic. Best is to have your doc write a predetermination letter to the insurance company outlining the issues and fees. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Insurance covers revision rhinoplasty to correct airway problems.

+1

Insurance covers revision rhinoplasty to correct airway problems. How much it will pay depends on how good the insurance is.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.