No Health Insurance, Getting Tummy Tuck and Medial Thigh Lift, What Medication is Best For Pain?

I'm just curious I have no health insurance and I'm doing self pay for my tummy tuck and my media thigh lift what medication is best for pain and one that is not expensive?

Doctor Answers (8)

Best Pain Meds Cash Pay.

+2

Dear LivLuvLaugh,

Thank you for your post.  Both Vicodin and Percocet are generic and work well.  Also, Valium is good for muscle spasms and is generic. 

Best Wishes,

Pablo PRichard, MD


Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Postoperative pain control

+1

Percocet and Vicodin are typically prescribed for these procedures. I also use a medication intraoperatively called Exparel. This is a long acting local anesthetic which has been great in reducing pain at the incision lines. Many patients have not needed pain pills following surgery with this. Your surgeon may have access to this medication which maylower your dependence pill medications.

David Bogue, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Pain medication is generally not very expensive.

+1

If narcotics are required for pain relief generics work well. Hydrocodone is a good choice. Their value can be enhanced by other pain medication such as acetaminophen or some of the anti-inflammatories.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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Pain medication after tummy tuck

+1

Most plastic surgeons use either Percocet, Vicodin or Tylenol with Codeine after surgery in addition to possibly Valium for muscle relaxation. These all have generics and are quite inexpensive. I agree with Dr. Shuster however, I use an excellent albeit expensive local anesthesia called Exparel in the operating room which has dramatically decreased the amount of pain in the first three days after surgery. Most patients do not require any narcotic medications after this.

Kevin Tehrani, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Medication cost minor compared to surgical costs

+1

If you are paying for a tummy tuck and inner thigh lift including the surgical fee operating room fees and the Anesthesiologist's fee, why are you concerned over medication cost.  The pain meds for the most part are generic and minimal.  

All of my patients are administered a new injectable drug called Exparel which lasts 72-96 hours and has cut down on pain med use almost 75%.  It is a slow release drug which your surgeon must use properly.  The cost runs about 400.00, but every patient has said it is well worth it!

Good luck with your surgery, Dr. Steven Schuster in Boca Raton.

Steven Schuster, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Pain Medication after Tummy Tuck

+1

Have the generic medications acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Motrin) if approved by your surgeon. Generic narcotics such as hydrocodone and oxycodone are typically recommended for the first few days after surgery. 

Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS
Ohio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Cost of meds

+1

I agree with Dr. Hughes that the cost of medication is going to very small compared to the cost of the surgical procedures you are having.  In addition I would consider going to a surgeon who enrolls patients in a program such as cosmetassure to cover you postoperatively in case of a significant complication.  Best of luck!

Evan Sorokin, MD
Cherry Hill Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

No Health Insurance, Getting Tummy Tuck and Medial Thigh Lift, What Medication is Best For Pain?

+1

                 I would ask the surgeon you have selected.  The cost of these medications will be significantly lower than any of the surgical fees.

 

 

Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.