Does Healing Time After Blepharoplasty Differ Depending on Extent Procedure?

Does recovery take longer if also fat and tissue is removed than if only excess skin is removed? How much longer does the recovery take?

Doctor Answers (7)

Blepharoplasty recovery is quick

+3

Generally speaking, Upper Blepharoplasty is one of the quickest procedures to recover from.

The extent of the surgery and the amount of bruising and swelling would be a good indicators as to how long it would take to heal.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 125 reviews

Extent of procedure usally does affect healing time

+2

When a blepharoplasty is performed, there will be some degree of bruising and swelling due to trauma to the tissues. The more that is done during a blepharoplasty, the more likely it is that bruising and/or swelling will occur. Removal of skin only, versus removing skin and fat will likely produce less swelling and bruising, and therefore, less healing time. The average time difference between the two would be a few days to a week.  Having said that, the degree of swelling and bruising can vary tremendoulsy between patients even having the exact same procedure. There is generally more bruising in lower lid blepharoplasty than upper lid blepharoplasty. I would estimate an average 'back to work time' of 1 week for uppers and 2 weeks for lowers.
 

Lawrence Tong, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Healing after eyelid surgery

+1
Healing after eyelid surgery varies a bit from patient to patient and also depending in the extent of surgery.  In general, however, the initial healing phase takes only about a week before the stitches are removed and you can start being seen in public. 

Ronald J. Edelson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Blepharoplasty revoery

+1

There is some variability in the recovery time from a blepharoplasty. If the technique of skin excision only and/or skin excision with small amount of fat removal is used, you will have a quicker recovery (about a week), but you may not see the same improvement as you would with some laser abrasion over the upper and lower lids and crows foot area. Even if laser is added in, the recovery is typically no longer than 10 days and frequently only 7. Always weigh the pros and cons of quick recovery and better improvement.

Deason Dunagan, MD
Huntsville Plastic Surgeon
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I do find that there is more bruising after blephroplasty when fat is removed.

+1

I do find that there is more bruising associated with a blephroplasty when fat is removed as opposed to only skin removal. In general, the more bruising the longer it takes to look normal after a blephroplasty. Bruising can require one to two weeks to dissipate.

David A. Ross, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

Usually not difficult but.....

+1

Blepharoplasty surgical recovery is usually uneventful but you are right it depends on the extent of the procedure, the duration of time of the procedure and if any complications occurred during the procedure.  

Sometimes there may be swelling in the morning that resolves during the course of the day due to immature lymphatic drainage after surgery.  This resolves several weeks after the surgery.

Dr. ES

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Blepharoplasty Recovery Easy!

+1

In reality, the healing process should be the same regardless of whether you remove skin only, or need to remove fat as well.  Most women have a fair amount of swelling for a few days, and some have a good amount of bruising as well.  However, at the one week mark, almost everyone is doing well, the swelling is down, and the bruising is resolving.  There is very little pain with this surgery, and usually is something that can be done under light sedation if desired.  I hope this helps.

Christopher V. Pelletiere, MD
Barrington Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

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