HBP and Hypothyroidism - Am I a Good Candidate for Breast Augmentation?

Hi, I'm 42 years old in good health minus my high blood pressure and hypothyroidism. My BP is well controlled and they just had to increase my Levothyroxine to 0.088mg because one of my levels was over 10,000. I can't remember which one, but once I'm restablized on my thyroid meds, would I be a good candidate for breast augmentation?

Doctor Answers (8)

Health status and breast augmentation

+1

These are common medical issues we see in the population.  If they are well controlled, it should not be an issue with respect to your breast augmentation.  Your plastic surgeon will decide if you need to be evaluated by an internal medicine specialist before your surgery for medicine clearance.


Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 113 reviews

Medical condions and breast augmentation

+1

These are relatively common disordiers in the breast augmentation population and I do not see any reason why you would not get an ohterwise great result. Ensure that your anestheisologiist is aware and discuss your plans to have surgery wiht your internist. You may alos want to obtain a mammogram prior to surgery.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Chronic Medical Issues and Breast Augmentation

+1

Once your medical conditions are stable you can have a breast augmentation.  Obviously, would need to have an examination of your breasts to see if an augmentation is reasonable for you.

Dr. ES

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Medical clearance before plastic surgery

+1

Your medical condition is not a contraindication to breast augmentation. For safety reasons you should have a medical clearance by the doctor who manages your blood pressure and hypothyroidism prior to any elective surgery.

Aaron Stone, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon

HBP and Hypothyroidism - Am I a Good Candidate for Breast Augmentation?

+1

Only with a full written medical clearance would I undertake your surgery. This is for your protection. Best of luck from MIAMI DR. Darryl J. Blinski, 305 598 0091

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

High Blood Pressure, Low Thyroid Hormone levels should be corrected before Cosmetic Surgery

+1

Regarding: "HBP and Hypothyroidism - Am I a Good Candidate for Breast Augmentation?
Hi, I'm 42 years old in good health minus my high blood pressure and hypothyroidism. My BP is well controlled and they just had to increase my Levothyroxine to 0.088mg because one of my levels was over 10,000. I can't remember which one, but once I'm restablized on my thyroid meds, would I be a good candidate for breast augmentation
?"

Once your blood pressure is normalized as are your thyroid hormone levels and your internist does not feel you have a high cardiac risk to undergo this (or other) operations, there is NO reason why you should not be able to undergo a safe cosmetic surgery. Thousands of people just like you are having Plastic Surgery the world over.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Thanks for your service to Our Country, and Merry Christmas

+1

There should be no contraindication to you having a breast augmentation when your thyroid disease and blood pressure are stable. You must be in pretty good shape if you are serving in our military in Afghanistan. 

Carl W. "Rick" Lentz III, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Breast augmentation and medical issues

+1

If your blood pressure and thyroid issues are controlled, you should be able to undergo a breast augmentation safely.  You would require some routine bloodwork prior to surgery, and your surgeon might request that your regular doctor evaluate and clear you prior to surgery.  Good luck, /nsn.

Nina S. Naidu, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.