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Should I Have a Hardness at the Top of Both Breasts After a Lift?

My lift was done in December 2007 by a Board Certified physician. A few days ago, my husband noticed a hardness in my left breast. I checked and found the same hardness in my right breast. He hasn't touched me there since before the surgery and I've had regular mammographies, but I want to be sure whether I should be concerned or not. Please advise. Let me add that I am still very pleased with my 50 year old breasts, but he has caused me to be concerned. Thanks in advance for your help!

Doctor Answers (3)

Hardness in the breasts

+1

It is unclear from your description what this could be without a thorough exam. I suggest you see your surgeon and get evaluated.


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Breast Hardness 2 years after a Breast Lift

+1

Sadly, the breast is a cancer prone organ. As high as one in 7 American women will be affected by it. As a result, women need to be vigilant about ANY masses in their breast. Detecting masses in the breast is NOT your husband, boyfriend, doctor or nurse's job - it is yours. For your safety you should routinely massage your breasts systematically each time you shower. In this way, a lot of women were able to pick cancers before they became too large.

In your case, the odds are that this is not cancer. The time line is too long. But - I would not rest until this is ruled out. See your GYN or Family Doctor and make sure you have a MRI or biopsy to make sure. You should also visit your Plastic surgeon and get his suggestions.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Hard masses after breast lift

+1

Although this is most likely an area of fat necrosis, it could indicate anopther problem which needs to be evaluated radiologically and/or surgically. Dicuss this with your surgeon.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

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