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What Happens if Sculptra is Injected into a Vessel in the Temporal Area?

Doctor Answers (5)

Sculptra Injections in the Temporal Area?

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Thank you for your question. Sculptra is a very safe and effective filler for global volume improvement with a very natural look. It is best avoided for injecting into the vessel, and proper placement of the product is best.  If it occurs, you will likely get a bruise, and the product is lost.  Sculptra is a safe filler and mostly a diluted substance, so there is a very low risk of side effects when injected, even into an artery.  Be sure to be under the supervision of a board certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon with expertise in fillers for the best and safest results. I hope this helps.

Bay Area Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Can Sculptra be injected in a temple vessel?

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Sculptra is a great option for rejuvenating sunken temples. It's understandable that you might be concerned about it being injected into a vessel since there are so many visible vessels in the temple area. But Sculptra is always placed into the deepest area of the temple where there are no blood vessels. This is a very safe zone for injection of Sculptra or other fillers. If a small surface vessel is nicked on the way through the skin it's possible to get a bruise on the surface of the skin. 

Because Sculptra is a very watery suspension and the particles are very small, the risk of blocking a vessel and causing harm to skin or other structures is very low. It's actually much less a risk than with a thick filler such as the hyaluronic acids and Radiesse.

San Antonio Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Sculptra injected into a vessel

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All manufacturers of any devices present in the description of their product any possible untoward effects, even theoretical.

Injection of Sculptra into an artery has never been reported in the US.

The way Sculptra is now diluted: 5cc of  sterile water and 4 cc of 1% Lidocaine, makes it unlikely to be able to occlude a blood vessel.

Also, a well trained MD will know to inject  Sculptra  deeply, under the muscle in the temporal area.  No vessels or nerves are there.

Sculptra is an excellent , very safe filler that can last for 1-2 years.

Eugene Mandrea M.D.

Chicago Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Intravascular injection of Sculptra

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Injection of filler material into a vessel can cause blockage of the vessel with loss of blood supply to the nearby skin/structures. Pain and a dusky appearance to the skin occurs relatively quickly (usually within 30 minutes). Since Sculptra is such a watery filler, blockage of vessels is very uncommon. In addition, most injectors place Sculptra deep in the temples, where there are no blood vessels. If you hear a pop during injection, this indicates that the injection is in a safe, deep pocket where blood vessels do not travel. Injection of the temples, however, can cause pain with chewing temporarily. This is not an indication of intravascular injection.

Chesterfield Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

What happens if Sculptra is injected into a vessel in the temporal area?

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Normally when Sculptra is injected, the syringe is aspirated before it is injected to make sure that the needle is not in a blood vessel.  When the procedure is performed in this manner, it would be extremely unusual to inject Sculptra directly into a blood vessel.  If this occurred in the temple, there are really a spectrum of issues that could happen.  There could be just some temporary blanching to the temporal area that would resolve within a few minutes.  It is also possible that there could be some longer term occlusion of a blood vessel that potentially could cause some tissue necrosis or even more significant damage.  Because the temple area is supplied by a rich blood supply, I think the latter possibility would be extremely rare.  

San Francisco Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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