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Hanging Columella on Just One Nostril, What Can Cause This?

Can anyone explain this and why it might occur

Doctor Answers (11)

What can cause a hanging columella?

+1

Photos would really be necessary to provide you with the best advice. The appearance of asymmetry can be due to the following:

1) Receding nostril on one side
2) Asymmetric tip cartilage
3) Septal deviation

An exam would be necessary to tell for sure, and this would be the next step. There are likely treatment options available, but a revision procedure would be necessary to improve the issue. Your nostril can be lowered if necessary using cartilage grafts if that is the cause. A residual deviated septum can be repaired, and your tip cartilages can be improved as well. Seek the advice of a board certified facial plastic surgeon with great credentials and fellowship training. I hope this helps, and I wish you the best of luck.


Charlotte Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Hanging Columella on Just One Nostril - Columella and nostril shapes Primary Causes

+1

Columella and nostril shapes are conditioned by race, familiar tendency, and can be hereditary. The deviation may be caused by early stage traumas, altering the otherwise natural appearance of tissue growth. It would be good to see a photo to be able to determine the probably problem.

Alberto Di Giuseppe, MBBS
London Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Hanging Columella on One Nostril

+1

A unilateral hanging columella can be caused by a deviated septum or asymmetry of the tip cartilages between the nostrils. Both problems can be corrected with limited surgery.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Asymmetric Columella

+1

The asymmetric columella can occur for a variety of reasons which include-  post-op undesirable result due to less than ideal surgical technique, associated with a septum on its bottom that is deviated towards that side of the nose where the columella is lower, and sometimes it just is a genetic feature or something associated with some trauma.  This can be corrected with proper surgical steps.

Jeffrey Epstein, MD, FACS
Miami Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Hanging columella on one side

+1

 A hanging columella commonly is on both sides, but with a deviated septum it may favor one side more than the other.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Hanging columella only on one side

+1

 A hanging columella can occur  on one or both sides. A hanging columella on one side is usually related to a deviated caudal septum which can cause nasal obstruction. This can be addressed at the time of rhinoplasty. Please see the link below for hanging columella in other patients that we have repaired.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Hanging columella in just one side

+1

You may have a deviated septum under the hanging side of the columella causing the asymmetry.

Another possibility is that your have nostril margin retraction on one side allow more nostril to be seen.

It's hard to saw what is going on in your case with out seeing your nose.

Check out my web reference below to read more about hanging columella repair.

Thomas A. Lamperti, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Hanging columella caused by underlying cartilege.

+1

The skin of the columella takes on the contour of the cartilage underneath it.  Your bump can be due to either the alar cartilages or the bottom end of the nasal septum.  A detailed exam would help decide this and the correct cousre of action to correct it.

Jeffrey M. Darrow, MD
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Hanging columella

+1

Asymmetry of the columella is most likely due to asymmetry in the cartilages running down from your nasal tip to the lip. it could also be due to a deviation of the end (caudal) septum. You really need an examination before anyone can tell you more.

Ronald Schuster, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Asymmetric columella

+1

A hanging columella on just one side can result from asymmetric positioning of the medial crura (the portions of the tip cartilages which sit between the nostrils). This can occur naturally or following a prior rhinoplasty, if one cartilage settles in at a different height than the other. Pictures and certainly an in-person examination would be useful to assess your situation. 

Correction of this issue can be as straightforward as shaving the lower hanging cartilage, which can be performed through a tiny incision under local anesthesia in the office. However, if there are additional tip concerns, a rhinoplasty focusing on the tip (tip-plasty) may be appropriate. This can be either an open or closed (endonasal) rhinoplasty, depending on the type and severity of issues and the surgeon's preference. I'd recommend seeing a rhinoplasty specialist in your area and ask to see before/afters similar to yours. 

Best regards,

Dr. Mehta

Umang Mehta, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.