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Age 28, Skin Laxity, Loss of Firmness Of Soft Tissue; Would I Be a Good Candidate for Ultherapy?

Hi, I am 28 with some skin laxity, and descent/ loss of firmness of underlying soft tissue. The issue seems in part to be caused by volume loss also. I have the beginnings of a double chin and something 'jowly' going on! Also, my cheeks seem to have lowered. Could ultherapy help?

Doctor Answers (7)

Ultherapy Candidate

+1

Thank you for your question. Ultherapy is commonly used on areas of the face and neck to address sagging of the eyelids, brow, cheeks, chin and jawline. It has excellent results in terms of tightening and lifting skin. However, it does not work to reverse volume loss. I would schedule a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon to discuss your options.


Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 93 reviews

Loss of facial support at 28

+1

first, you need an excellent in-person evaluation to determine the cause of your complaints. At 28 years of age, there shouldn't be much jowl formation or fat atrophy in the cheeks. Although Ultherapy has been proven to have a very high safety profile you need to determine first if this is appropriate for your physical exam and its findings and if it would have a good probability of improving the condition and providing you with a result with which you would be happy.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Ulthera Is Designed To Tighten The Skin

+1

Ulthera is designed to tighten skin without any down time.  It will not replace volume loss.  Ulthera may help a lot depending on your past and current medical history.   If you are diabetic or currently taking steroidsm, Ulthera is not recommended.  Also, any other chronic conditions may cause Ulthera not to work.

Cory Lawler, MD
Melbourne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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Ultherapy for mid 20s

+1

At age 28, Ultherapy could be a good option. It is very good for young people because it stimulates collagen and tightens skin.  It doesn’t create volume like Sculptra, but is an excellent therapy for tightening jowls (particularly in young people who are not overweight and have laxity).

Joseph A. Eviatar, MD, FACS
New York Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Age 28, Skin Laxity, Loss of Firmness Of Soft Tissue; Would I Be a Good Candidate for Ultherapy?

+1

Ultherapy is an excellent option for early laxity that is noticeable but not yet a surgical problem. The double chin as well as he jowls respond nicely to the ultrasound energy. The cheeks dropping are less likely to see as much improvement as the jowls and double chin.

 

Felix Bopp, MD
New Orleans Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Yes, Ultherapy may help!

+1

If your goal is to firm, tighten, and improve the contour of you cheeks and neck, then Ultherapy may be a good choice.  

Ulthera works by causing micro focused thermal injury to the skin and deep tissues under the skin.  Over time your body undergoes a wound healing response that repairs and grow new collagen.  The increase in collagen is what gives an improvement in contour and tightening of the skin.

Your best option is to have a personal evaluation and consultation with an experienced provider of the treatment.  You can go to the website for the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery and look for a board certified plastic surgeon in your area that offers Ulthera. (see link below)

Good luck!

 

Dan Mills, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Ultherapy would be a good choice

+1

It sounds like that you might be a good candidate for Ultherapy.  This procedure aims to address the increase in skin laxity and loss of subcutaneous volume by delivering ultrasound energy to deeper structures of the skin. You would need a medical evaluation to assess whether you are in fact a good candidate for Ultherapy.

Chang Son, MD
Fort Lee Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.