Ask a doctor

Expectations For Going Back to Work 4 Weeks Post TT with MR and Mini-facelift and Being on my Feet All Day

I am having a full TT with MR and a mini-facelift. Just wondering is it unreasonable to expect to go back to full time work four weeks post op. My job requires me to work a 9 hour day and I will be on my feet for most of it.

Doctor Answers (8)

1 month post-op from TT

+2

While most people are medically able to return to work after four weeks, you may not feel like going back to work. You may still have some discomfort, lack of energy and little endurance for a 9 hour workday.

I recommend that you take a longer recovery or at least when you go back for the first week, try half days if your employer will let you.

Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Return to Most Workplace Environments 4 weeks after Tummy Tuck Should be Possible

+2

Hi there-

Without knowing more about your specific responsibilities at work, and more about you and the details of your operation (not all of these operations are the same), it is difficult to responsibly answer your question...

On the other hand, generally speaking, in my experience I would say that the vast majority of my patients are more than able to return to work after 4 weeks, and in fact in most patients, my greatest concern 4 weeks after surgery is that they feel well enough to do things I do not want them to do yet.

Most patients feel able to do anything they want after 2-3 weeks, but the fact is that human healing will not allow for vigorous muscular activity until at least 6 weeks have passed from surgery. So even if you return to work after 4 weeks, it is important that there be no heavy lifting or physical exertion for another two.

Finally, I would say that regardless of what any of us on this site say, you owe it to your plastic surgeon to follow the instructions and recommendations that they give you. Only your surgeon knows the details of your situation and the surgery planned for you, and so only they will be best equipped to guide you to a smooth recovery and lovely outcome.

Web reference: http://www.MommyMakeoverOrlando.com

Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

Tummy Tuck and Facelift Recovery?

+2

Thank you for the question. 

Although you may be able to return to your routine four weeks  after the operation,  I would suggest you plan for longer recovery.

Keep in mind, that you are about to undergo major surgery that involves major physical and emotional “recovery”. Some words of advice may be helpful...

You are about to undergo a major operation which often involves a significant physical and emotional recovery. A few words of advice may be helpful:

1. Make sure you are doing the procedure for the right reasons (for yourself)  and that you have realistic expectations.  Be aware that an improvement in the “problem area” may not translate to an overall improvement in your life   situation.  You are bound to be disappointed with results of the procedure if your motivation for doing the surgery is not internally driven.

2. Time your surgery carefully; generally, it is not a good idea to have surgery done during or immediately after a stressful period in life (for example divorce or death of a loved one). The additional stress of surgery will undoubtedly be  more challenging to deal with if a patient's emotional reserves our already exhausted. Remember, that an improvement in your physical appearance will not translate to an improvement in your life situation.

3. If possible speak to patients who have undergone similar procedures and query them about the toughest times of their recovery period. Any practical hints previous patients can provide may be very helpful.

4. Make sure you are aware of potential complications that may arise how to reach your surgeon if necessary.

5. Make sure you have a strong and patient support system (several people if possible) in place who have time/patience to take care of you. Arrange for professional nursing if any doubt exists regarding the availability and/or stamina  of your caretakers.

6. Be patient with the healing process, understanding that it will take several weeks to months to feel “normal” again. It may also take many months/year to see the end results of your surgery.

7. Be prepared to distract your mind with things of interest such as books, magazines, and movies.

8. Expect less of yourself; do not go back to work, school or chores too early and let others take care of you (for a change).

9. Pick your surgeon carefully (a well experienced board-certified plastic surgeon) and trust in his/her advice. Keep in close communication with your surgeon and do not hesitate to communicate questions/concerns and the   emotional swings that you may experience.

10. Resume all medications that you were using preoperatively when cleared by your plastic surgeon and stop the use of narcotics and sedatives as soon as feasible after surgery.

11. Keep in mind the end results as you go through the tougher emotional times after your surgery.
I hope this helps.

Web reference: http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com/Procedures/procedure_tummytuck.htm

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 627 reviews

When can patients return to work after tummy tuck and face lift?

+1

Most patients can return to work after four weeks This also depends on your conditioning before surgery and how fast you normally recuperate from procedures.

Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Expectations For Going Back to Work 4 Weeks Post TT with MR and Mini-facelift and Being on my Feet All Day

+1

Hard to advise but it is possible but it depends upon your healing or lack there of. Best to fully understand these risks. 

Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Return to work post tt

+1
You can do it at four weeks: but you will struggle to do a 9 hour day on your feet. If you wear compression stockings and a compression garment round your waist it will help. The problem is that after a few hours on your feet your lower tummy and ankles will swell and you'll feel exhausted. So you'll need to be strategic to return to 9 hours on your feet after 4 weeks. Frequent breaks, try to rest with your feet up on breaks, maybe try to work shorter days in the first week, plan for a tough first week. With planning and if all goes well it should be possible to manage it. Good luck.
Melbourne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Return to work after tummy tuck and mini-facelift

+1

There is great variation in how quickly patients return to work after surgery.  A tummy tuck is one of the most difficult cosmetic procedures to recover from because of the tightening of the abdominal muscles.  This is particularly true for  patients who have jobs that require heavy lifting, bending, and crawling.  I generally ask my patients to reflect back on how they have recovered from other procedures: was it fast, slow, or in between.   Previous experience often can help with predictions of the future recovery.

I have had patients return to work as early as 4 days after tummy tuck, but this was the exception.  Most patients require at least 2-3 weeks, and some longer.    When you return, expect to move somewhat more slowly and to be more fatigued.  You should realize that full recovery will take a few months.  Don't push yourself to return too early and have plenty of help around the house.  Good luck.

Charlotte Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Return to work after surgery

+1
Generally, patients can return to sedentary work two weeks after abdominoplasty and four weeks would seem to be an ample period within which to recuperate. However, complications can arise, especially after extended surgeries, and you spend a lot of time on your feet. Ideally, it would be wise to explain to your employer that you may need to work light duty for several weeks after your return or, if this is not possible, to inquire about whether you can delay returning to work, if necessary.
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.