Will breast implant removal negatively affect my breastfeeding ability?How long after having the removal can I breastfeed again?

I've had silicone implants for four years (under the muscle, incision made under the fold of the breast). I'm exclusively breastfeeding my 7-month-old but want the implants removed ASAP but I don't want to negatively affect breastfeeding future children. Breastfeeding is extremely important to me. I don't have any problems right now with the implants that I'm aware of. How long after weaning can I have the explant? How long after the explant surgery do I need to wait until breastfeeding again?

Doctor Answers (7)

Breast feeding after explant

+2
If you are able to breast feed with the implants, it would be unlikely that you would have a problem after the implants are removed. It is probably wise to wait 3 months after you have stopped breast feeding to have the removed.

After the implant is removed you can start breast feeding at your next pregnancy. You would not want to undergo anesthesia if you are currently pregnant or breast feeding.

Best Regards,
Dr. Stutman


Mesa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Removing implants should not affect the ability to breast feed

+2
Thanks for your question. It is unclear why you want the breast implants removed. If you have soft implants and relatively normal capsules then this could be done very soon. If there is a contracture, then I would wait at least 3 months from stopping breast feeding before having surgery. Once the implants have been removed, you should be able to breast feed your next pregnancy. Best of Luck!

M. Scott Haydon, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Breast feeding after implant removal

+2
Breast feeding should not affect you ability to breast feed but you would probably like to wait at least a few months before breast feeding again.  Implant removal is typically not too difficult to perform or under go, so in most cases you should be fine.

William J. Hedden, MD
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 154 reviews

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Will breast implant removal negatively affect my breastfeeding ability?

+2
Thank you for the question. Removal of breast implants will not negatively affect breast-feeding in the future. I would suggest that you wait at least 3 to 6 months after you have stopped breast-feeding before you undergo elective breast surgery.  You may find the attached link, dedicated to breast implant removal concerns, helpful to you. Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 751 reviews

Will breast implant removal negatively affect my breastfeeding ability?How long after having the removal can I breastfeed again?

+2
Discuss breastfeeding and implant removal with your Plastic Surgeon, as well as your OBGYN doctor.  Having the implants removed will not have a negative affect on breastfeeding.  

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Breast feeding and implant removal

+1
You can safely remove silicone breast implant and breast feed your baby after healing. Most of us recommend at least 4-6 weeks after implant removal. If you plan this well before pregnancy, it should not be an issue. Make sure to see a plastic surgeon for full evaluation.

Stanley Okoro, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

Wait 3-6 months after weaning before pursuing explantation.

+1
If nursing is a priority to you, I recommend waiting until after you’ve weaned your baby before pursuing explantation. Performing surgery and going through recovery while still maintaining your milk supply would be challenging to say the least. After weaning, I suggest waiting at least 3 months (6 would be better) before pursuing explantation. Your breasts need time to go back to their natural pre-breastfeeding size and profile in order for you to see the best results. Removing your breast implants shouldn’t affect your ability to breastfeed future children, although keep in mind that many women even without implants find their nursing capacity varies from baby to baby.

David N. Sayah, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.