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General Anesthesia Vs. Epidural for TT

I went for a consult yesterday with a PS who comes recommended. My husband is a doctor as well, & he knows this guy personally and professionally. During my consult, the PS told me that he operates out of a surgery center and that he does the sx under sedation w/an epidural rather than general anesthesia. He said that he prefers it that way, but if I wanted general, he could also do it. He is highly confident in the staff anesthesiologists at the sx center as well. Any input? Thanks!

Doctor Answers (4)

Type of anesthesia for Tummy Tuck?

+1

Both general and epidural anesthesia can work very well and be safe in the proper hands (anesthesiologist). I, however, would choose general anesthesia if I were having a tummy tuck.
 

Highlands Plastic Surgeon

General Anesthesia Vs. Epidural for TT

+1

Just to understand your posting, epidural as an outpatient, HUMMM! I would ask to personally speak to 3 patients who have undergone their tummy tucks with out patient epidural. Also urinary retension is a real issue. I think I would discuss further. From MIAMI Dr. B

Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Epidural versus general anesthesia for tummy tuck

+1

In the hands of an experienced anesthesiologist who perfroms the epidurals frequently, this can be an excellent option and provide prolonged post-operative pain control. I think it is an excellent option. My only concern with this technique is the greater potential for urinary retention and possible need for a bladder catheter.

Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

General anesthesia and epidural are both good options for tummy tuck

+1

The decision about which type of anesthesia to have for an abdominoplasty really comes down to preferences: yours, the anesthesiologist's, and the surgeon's. From a safety point of view there is little difference and you should be comfortable either way.

Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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