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Gallbladder Removal and Tummy Tuck - Belly Button transformation?

A few years ago I had a laparoscopic removal of my gallbladder which resulted in a large and odd looking belly button when they sewed it up. I am now interested in getting a tummy tuck and wanted to how my belly button will affect the results of my tummy tuck? Does it make the tummy tuck more difficult?

Doctor Answers (3)

Umbilicoplasty at the time of tummy tuck

+2

Thank you for your question. It is tough to say without photos. If you belly button scar bothers you, ask your plastic surgeon specifically what can be done at the time of tummy tuck to fix it and ask specifically how it is going to be fixed.  It is often possible to do umbilicoplasty to correct an unsightly belly button scar.


Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Belly Button

+2

Don't worry about the belly button, we re make one during the tummy tuck operation. The laparascopic scars are much better to deal with than the old large subcostal scar.
 

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Belly Button and Tummy Tuck?

+2

 Thank you for the question.

It is difficult to give you accurate advice without direct examination;  generally, it is possible to improve the appearance of the bellybutton during tummy tuck surgery. Previous surgery/scarring does necessitate planning of the bellybutton incision line ( to maximize blood flow and minimize potential for complications).

The appearance of the umbilicus after tummy tuck surgery is of critical importance to many patients. Essentially, it is the only scar visible when patients are wearing undergarments or swimming suits. It can be a telltale sign of a patient who has had abdominal plastic surgery.  As much as possible, it is best to keep the belly button relatively small, oval shaped, and attempt to hide the resulting scars.
 
Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 793 reviews

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