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27 years old, 4'11, 2 kids and loose skin. Should i do a full or a mini TT? (photo)

I'm 27 and 4'11 after having two kids have so much lose skin.

Doctor Answers (11)

Full vs mini tummy tuck

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A mini tummy tuck is performed in patients with a pooch below the navel, but a flat stomach above the belly button.  Only the muscles below the belly button are tightened and the extra skin under the belly button is removed.  During a mini tummy tuck the belly button is not moved.  You are left with a horizontal scar low on the pelvis that typically does not extend all the way to the hips. In a full tummy tuck I make an incision low on the pelvis from hip to hip.  I loosen the skin all the way up to the rib cage and cut around the belly button.  I repair the loose abdominal muscles and remove the excess belly skin.  I then stretch the remaining skin down to the incision I made in the pelvis.  I make an incision over the navel to bring the belly button through.  You are left with an incision low on the pelvis from hip to hip and an incision around the belly button.  Based on your pictures, a full tummy tuck would be more appropriate in order to address your upper abdomen as well as lower.


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 422 reviews

Tummy Tuck Options

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Thank you for your question and for sharing your photo.  Given the amount of skin laxity evident on your photo a full tummy tuck would be a better choice for you. A mini tummy tuck is only effective in tightening your abdominal muscles and removing a small amount of loose skin below your belly button.  Your skin laxity extends to above the belly button making this a less than ideal procedure.  Best wishes!

Robert F. Centeno, MD, FACS
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

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Full or Mini Tummy Tuck?

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Based upon the side view posted photo you need a full Tummy Tuck  with muscle repair. Seek in person evaluations.//

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Full or mini TT

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Thanks  a lot   for  the  pictures ,    the   condition    of  your  skin  : extra   skin , remarkable strech  marks ,  and  laxity of   muscular  wall  are  special  conditions   that  require  a  full   TT ,  a mini  TT    will  offer    you also  mini    results    with non sthetical  final results . Your correct    surgery  will be  a  full  TT

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Full vs. Mini tummy tuck

+1

Generally, most patients will achieve a better result with a standard, or "full" tummy tuck, especially if there is loose skin above the belly button.  But you should be examined in person to get the best advice and to understand the pro's and con's of each.  Good luck.

Dean Fardo, MD
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5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Full or Mini?

+1

Thank you for the question. You would not be happy with a mini tuck. A full TT should give you a great result.

Good luck.

Peter Fisher, MD
San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
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Full or Mini Tummy Tuck?

+1

There are a variety of surgical procedures or combinations that can produce good results in patients with abdominal laxity, depending on multiple factors including their anatomy and degree of desired improvement: A mini tummy tuck, an umbilical float modified tummy tuck, a full abdominoplasty. Each of these can be performed with or without liposuction. They produce different degrees of improvement. Based on your photos, a full tummy tuck and selective areas of liposuction would produce the best cosmetic result.

Keep in mind, that following the advice of anyone who would presume to tell you what to do based on two dimensional photos without taking a full medical history, examining you, feeling and assessing your tissue tone, discussing your desired outcome and fully informing you about the pros and cons of each option would not be in your best interest. Find a plastic surgeon that you are comfortable with and one that you trust and listen to his or her advice. The surgeon should be certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and ideally a member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS). You should discuss your concerns with that surgeon in person.

 

Robert Singer, MD  FACS

La Jolla, California

Robert Singer, MD
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Do not consider a limited incision abdominoplasty

+1

No question that you are a candidate for a standard abdominoplasty.  With your degree of abdominal wall laxity and skin redundancy you need a regular abdominoplasty.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Mini or Full Tummy Tuck?

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 Thank you for the question and picture. Based on your history and photograph, I think you will do best with a full tummy tuck operation.

In my opinion, the mini tummy tuck is an  operation that  produces very limited results and is very rarely indicated. It involves a shorter incision but does not address the majority of the abdominal wall issues present for most patients who present consultation. For example, the area of skin excised is quite small. The abdominal wall musculature is addressed below the umbilicus leaving the upper number wall potentially lax. The appearance of the umbilicus is not necessarily addressed sufficiently.

For most patients who have had pregnancies and/or weight loss a full abdominoplasty is necessary to achieve the desired results. Of course, there are downsides (including a longer scar and probably a longer recovery time) but for most patients the benefits outweigh the downsides. It is not unusual to see patients who've had mini tummy tuck  surgery present for  revisionary surgery.


I hope this, and the attached link, helps.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 759 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.