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Full Body Massage After Face and Neck Lift?

I had a neck and facelift 6 weeks ago. Still have some swelling on one side. Is it okay to lie face down during a full body massage?

Doctor Answers (13)

Body Massage after Facelift

+2

That's an easy one: not only is it ok, I'd encourage it!  Surgery of any sort is stressful on your body.  Because of this, you may notice muscle aches and pains not in the area that you've treated. I highly encourage you to have a full-body massage if it helps you feel better and calms your nerves.  However, stay away from the head and neck for the first month or so to allow the skin to heal.


Lone Tree Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Full Body Massage After Facelift

+1

We usually allow our facial patients to have massages within 7-10 days which we do with our in-house massage therapist. You can certainly have a full body massage within 4-6 weeks after a facelift without significant swelling.

Rod J. Rohrich, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Full body massage after face and neck lift?

+1

I would recommend speaking with your surgeon regarding his or her guidelines, as they may have specific instructions they would like you to follow. It should be ok after 6 weeks, but there is a possibility of additional swelling. I hope this helps, and i wish you the best of luck.

Paul S. Nassif, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

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Cosmetic Surgery is an Art and a Science

+1

Thank you for the question. Generally speaking it is ok to do this. You may want to discuss this with your surgeon first. Dr Thomas Narsete Austin, Tx

Thomas A. Narsete, MD (retired)
Austin Plastic Surgeon

Body Massage 6 Weeks After Face Lift

+1

At this point, you are well on your way of healing. A massage (including lying on your belly) should not harm your facelift recovery; rather, you deserve this treat after your procedure!

Frank P. Fechner, MD
Worcester Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Full body massage and facelift

+1

Since you are six weeks out from a facelift  and assuming that you are completely healed, you should be fine to have a massage. Enjoy!

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Facelift and body massage

+1

Lying face down after a facelift, even after 6 weeks, is going to increase your swelling. I wouldn't do it myself. How about a compromise and sit in a massage chair or lie on your back and have the therapist reach under you?  That way you can relax without getting a puffy face.

Deborah Ekstrom, MD
Worcester Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Full Body Massage After Face and Neck Lift?

+1

The speed of healing varies from person to person. I would recommend to check with your plastic surgeon. Considering everything is going according to plan at 6 weeks after a facelift should be safe to lay down for a full body massarge. Enjoy your relaxing time!

Humberto Palladino, MD
El Paso Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Massage after facelift

+1

Six weeks is usually enough post-op time to permit a massage.  The problem is that you still have some swelling on one side. I would recommend, that if your plastic surgeon says it's ok to have a massage, that you lie with your head turned to one side or the other on the table, rather than putting it into that hole in the headrest.  That would cause too much pressure on the cheeks and brow areas and might produce more swelling on the cheek. Most massage therapists are ok with you having your head to the side on the table instead. If he or she is not, find another one.

Norman Leaf, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon

6 Weeks After facelift

+1

I agree that you should first clear this activity with your Surgeon.  However, I would have no problem with a patient doing this at 6 weeks, assuming normal healing.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.