Breast Augmentation Healing--Issues?

I've got surgery next friday and I've come across some issues that I cannot find the answers to much online. After Breast Augmentation surgery how is your range of motion? Can you do normal things like straighten your hair or brush your teeth? Or is it just to painful and you kind of go without?

Doctor Answers (12)

Minimizing Pain after Breast Augmentation

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You should have full range of motion immediately after breast augmentation but it might be a bit uncomfortable the first few days to a week afterwards. You should be able to brush your teeth and comb your hair immediately. 
There are some techniques and medications that experienced plastic surgeons use to minimize pain after breast augmentation independent of the implant type. One of these is Exparel.
Exparel is extremely safe when used as directed. As it is injected through a small guage needle mostly under direct vision the complications are rare and less than the breast augmention itself. See the below link for more information. In my experience it is more effective than a pain pump (plus you don't have tubes hanging out of you that have to be removed).

In summary, Exparel is a very long-acting local anesthetic that has just been released. It lasts approximately 3 or more days following injection. This is the same length of time that a pain pump lasts and will therefore take the place of a pain pump. This means patients can enjoy the same effect of a pain pump, but without any catheters and no pain pump to carry around.
Exparel will be available for those concerned about minimizing discomfort after surgeries such as tummy tuck and breast augmentation.
Exparel costs the same as a pain pump and produces the same result but with less hassle.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Breast augmentation

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I encourage my patients to be active after surgery but to avoid any heavy lifting. The pain medication will help tremendously.

Norman Bakshandeh, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Daily Activities after Breast Augmentation

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    As long as you are not lifting anything heavier than 5 lbs or doing anything strenuous during the early postoperative period you are unlikely to do any damage.  However, the first 3 days to a week (depending upon patient size, implant size, etc.) you may have pain with daily activities.

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 238 reviews

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Breast Augmentation--post op instructions

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Please do call your surgeon to get his/her particular instructions regarding activity, since we all have our own recommendations. 

In my practice I encourage early motion, using pain as the limiting factor, and that has worked well. 

Thanks for your question, good luck with your upcoming procedure.

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Breast Augmentation Healing Issues

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Early on you will experience some soreness and limited range of motion with your arms. I would not expect you to be able to perform activities of daily living. You will be sore for at least one week. Some people are sore for two. Make sure you have a good support bra and your surgeon will give you medication to help.

Richard J. Brown, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Breast augmentation and healing

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In terms of exercise, usually I have patients wait at least 3 -4 weeks before starting aerobics and then 4-6 weeks before performign vigorous activity.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Breast aug healing

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Everyone is different, but after 2 days you should not be I much pain and should be able to shower, brush your hair and teeth, etc.  

Ronald J. Edelson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

How much arm movement after breast augmentation surgery is OK?

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Hey there ChelseaDawn,

Definitely call your surgeon in advance of YOUR breast augmentation procedure and request a hit list of instructions for your after surgery care. I specify "your" breast augmentation because the after care instructions often vary because of so many different factors.

TIPS on why after care for breast augmentation will vary:

1.  length and placement of the incision/or incisions

2.  size of implant

3.  placement of implant - above or below the muscle

4.  medical conditions

5.  types of stitches and style of wound closure

6.  dressings, bandages

7.  your pain tolerance

8.  issues related to bleeding, drains

I believe it is best to be super prepared before your operation for what to expect after your operation.  The less worrying and guessing you have to do, the better and the safer your recovery.

Thanks for asking!  Dr Ellen

 

Ellen A. Mahony, MD
Westport Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Pain After breast aug

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Every patient is different Chelsea.  I allow my patients to move their arms completely the first day and encourage them to do so.  I have been using a new long acting pain medication called Exparel which is a local anesthetic injected into the breast to give long lasting pain relief for up to 96 hours.  It is the same drug I use on my tummy tuck patients.  MOst aptients can lift up to 15 lbs the first week without difficulty and return to work within a week, depending upon their job.  I hope this helps you.

Steven Schuster, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

After breast augmentation.

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Brushing your teeth should not be a problem.  Straightening your hair may be a little difficult depending on how sore you are.  You will be on pain medications and should relax during the first few days.  After that you should start feeling a lot less sore.  Your surgeon should give you a good idea of what to expect. 

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.