Is Low Frequency Ultrasound (20-32 KHZ) for Lipolysis As Effective As High Frequency Ultrasound?

I have reviewed a few studies in Europe that have proven Low Frequency Ultrasound for lipolysis (20-32 KHZ) more affective then High frequency ultrasound. Is this true and does it actually implode the fat cells? Is it safe?. One company in the United States offers LFU for fat reduction and states that the fat cells are removed naturally resulting in a 1-2" waist circumferance reduction. I though LFU has not been approved by the FDA in the US?

Doctor Answers (2)

UltraShape Lipolysis

+1
UltraShape uses non thermal cavitation - destruction of the fat cells.  We are very excited for the introduction of this machine to the US market.


Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Fat removal

+1

The question between low and high frequency ultrasound is a common debate.  The most important issue is not the source of energy but the technique used (the doctor) and the expectations you are trying to achieve.  Ultrasound in general is not going to eliminate fat, that is only done through liposuction which can include RFAL devices designed to tighten the skin and help with cellulite.  Ultrasound devices can help non-surgically by disrupting the fat cell and reducing the size of it, thus reducing your circumference.  Some claims are made by some devices that they destroy the fat cell and some are approved for use in the USA.  It is more important that you seek the advice of a plastic surgeon who specializes in body contouring and who has several options, surgically and non-surgically, to offer you depending on your goals.  The device itself should not be your focus, the best and safest procedure done by a qualified doctor who assess your goals, should be your focus.

good luck on your search for the doctor and procedure as well as your aesthetic goals.

 

R. Stephen Mulholland, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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