Fraxel on Scars?

Should acne scars be treated as soon as they are formed or must they be given a period before getting treated? Will this affect result? I've read various fraxel clinical publications and learn that, although it's not common, a more than 75% improvement (even reaching 90%) can be achieved in individuals with acne scars . I'd like to know in this case, can scar actually look flat with only discoloration after treatments? Based on your experience, has there been any case where acne scar looks flatten in the naked eyes with only discoloration left after treatments? Thx. I appreciate your answer. :)

Doctor Answers (7)

Early treatment of acne scars with a skilled doctor is very important to prevent additional scarring.

+2

If early treatment of acne scars is undertaken with proper therapy, additional scarring can often be prevented. This may also prevent hyperpigmentation postinflammatory erythema and other complications.


Salt Lake City Dermatologic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Fraxel on Scars

+2

  I agree with Dr. Fitzpatrick that early treatment of acne lesions may decrease the chances of progression to depressed, hard to treat, acne scars.  This can be done with a variety of treatments including Fraxel lasers and light to medium chemical peels. I find that salicylic acid and TCA peels are very effective and can offer them at modest cost.  Good luck!

Lawrence Kass, MD
Saint Petersburg Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 42 reviews

Treating scars with Fraxel

+2

In general, a scar is in its remodeling stage for about the first 6 months.  It is optimal to treat these scars during the first few months if possible.  That being said, if your acne is still very active, it is recommended that you have a dermatologist get your acne under control prior to any laser for the scarring.  Hope this helps. 

Elizabeth Piantanida, MD
Colorado Springs Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

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All scars improve more with early treatment.

+2

Acne scars initially present as red firm bumps or spots. If these are treated early they may not progress to become scars. I often use the VBeam at this stage as it enhances wound healing as well as kills bacteria causing acne. There are other things that can be done but the basic principle is EARLY intervention 

Richard Fitzpatrick, MD (in memoriam)
San Diego Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Fraxel on Scars?

+1

Thank you for your question. There are two goals with acne scars.  Treating to improve the textural appearance, deep scars, etc., and the color of the redness in the scars.  V-Beam or Ipl is good for the color correction, and Fractional resurfacing is good for the surface and textural correction. I hope this helps!

Sonia Badreshia-Bansal, MD
Bay Area Dermatologist
4.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Acne scar treatment and options

+1

It is best to be aggressive in treating acne to have the least chance of scarring.  If you have scars from your acne, they can best be treated with a combination of lasers, retinoids, and chemical peels.  Fraxel at the 1550 wavelength is the most effective treatment but it depends on skin type and also the depth of the acne scars.  The discoloration can be treated with a combination of retinoids and hydroquinones.  It is most important to find an experienced dermatologist with cosmetic training since these scars are often difficult to treat and require a combination therapy.

Michele S. Green, MD
New York Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Fraxel for scars

+1

In my office in Orange County Fraxel is used frequently for scarring.  It helps many scars, including acne scars and post-surgical scars.  We recommend starting treatment 3-6 weeks after the scars first appear and treating monthly for at least 3 treatments.

Lorrie Klein, MD
Laguna Niguel Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 166 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.