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Fraxel Restore or Fraxel Repair for Melasma, Sunspot, White Spots

I am considering both fraxel restore and repair - i have melasma and sunspots, but also "white spots" - is either good for these? Also, the consultant at the dermatology spa told me if I did Fraxel repair (as opposed to restoree), my face would be like raw hamburger for a week, which of course terrified me. But perhaps she is just being honest...

Doctor Answers (2)

No Laser for Melasma

+1

I would look at laser treatments as a last resort for treating Melasma.  Melasma represents overactivity of the pigment producing cells so it is not as simple as "zapping" off a brown spot.  I have found the Fraxel Restore to be helpful for some patients.  Some patients will actually find that their Melasma might get worse with any laser or light based treatment so a small test spot might be a good idea.  I would exhaust treatments with topical hydroquinone, retinoids, and light peeling agents prior to using any laser or light based device.

Danville Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Fraxel Restore for Dyschromia (uneven skin pigment)

+1

The Fraxel Restore is a non-ablative laser which leaves the skin (epidermis) relatively intact making this a much less invasive choice. The Restore laser usually requires a series of 3 to 5 treatments. The Repair laser is ablative meaning that the skin is removed making the post operative recovery more intense. In general, a single Repair treatment will give you the benefit of 5 Restore treatments in terms of dyschromia (uneven color), skin texture, skin tone, and pore size. However, the Restore is limited in treating wrinkles and in tightening the skin.

If your main concern is uneven skin pigment and you do not want any downtime then I would recommend the Restore laser. If however, you would like wringle improvement and tighter skin then the Repair would be better.

Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

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