Upper Blepharoplasty Incision Near the Eyebrow?

Just had a consulation for upper and lower blepharoplasty. The doctor wants to make the upper incision near the eyebrow, rather than in the crease. Is that normal? If so, could anyone provide or link me to photos of such a thing? I saw a few in his office but I'm still not sure I'm comfortable with it. Thanks!

Doctor Answers (13)

Upper Lid Blepharoplasty incision is in the crease of the upper eyelid

+2

 

Dear Sanjoseteacher, A true upper lid blepharoplasty incision is placed in the crease of the upper eyelid. It is typically placed in the area that excess skin folds over or where you may see women use a shadow in that region. The purpose for this incision is that it heals well and is barely visible after a short recovery. If your surgeon is discussing a brow lift via an eyebrow incision this is another surgery and not one I am fond of. Blepharoplasty in the proper hands of a well skilled surgeon is a procedure with very high patient satisfaction and does not have an incision in the brow region. I would suggest another consultation with a board certified surgeon. Best regards, Michael V. Elam, M.D.


Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 136 reviews

Upper lid blepharoplasty placement

+2

The upper lid blepharoplasty scar is placed in the eyelid crease as this creates the least visible scarring.   Was your surgeon referring to a brow lift by any chance?  I would recommend that you see another board certified plastic surgeon for a second opinion.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Upper blepharoplasty incision

+2

Normally, the upper blepharoplasty incision is made in the upper eyelid crease.  There are some surgeons, especially in Korea, who place the incision in the sub-brow area.  Discuss your concern with your surgeon or consider getting another consult from an oculoplastic surgeon.

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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An Upper Blepharoplasty Incision

+1

The incision for an upper blepharoplasty should be on the upper eyelid crease to safely obtain the precise amount of skin and to hide scarring.  It’s possible that your surgeon was showing you the upper portion of the excision of skin which is above the crease.  I would either go back and clarify this point with your surgeon or perhaps get a second opinion with a board certified facial plastic surgeon or plastic surgeon.  Make sure that you research the doctor’s credentials and ask to see before and after photos of their work.  I hope this helps, good luck!

Paul L. Leong, MD, FACS
Pittsburgh Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Upper blepharoplasty incision below eyebrow

+1

The traditional upper eyelid blepharoplasty incision is made in the upper eyelid crease for the simple reason that it is very well hidden and allows for a safe and effective removal of skin and fat.  I have seen incisions just under the eyebrow for other reasons (removal of cysts or moles and for the treatment of facial fractures) and the scar is never as well hidden as the upper eyelid crease.  I would recommend getting another opinion for your procedure.

Michael Sundine, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Upper blepharoplasty incision site

+1

Upper blepharoplasty incision is made in the upper lid crease. This incision will conceal the scar and appears natural. What you’re describing is an incision made for brow lift, which is a totally different procedure and possible visible scars. You need to have a second opinion with a facial plastic surgeon in your area.

Kevin Sadati, DO
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 101 reviews

Where's the incision?

+1

Whenever seeking plastic surgery consultation for a cosmetic procedure, there should be no ambiguity over the placement of the incisions. I frequently draw the planned incision(s) on the patient during our consultation time together using a simple eye pencil that easily wipes off. This shows my patients unequivocally where the incisions will be, their orientation, their length, etc....  With regard to upper blepharoplasty incisions, the skin excised is at or above the natural eyelid crease. In other words, the lower edge of the incision is at the crease, while the upper aspect of the incision is inferior to the eyebrow. Therefore, I wouldn't give up on your surgeon too quickly because of this- you likely heard good things about him/her and that's what spurred you to select this person in the first place.  Explain your question to his coordinator, and I'm certain they'll invite you back for a 2nd consultation and make things more clear. Additionally, ask to see more patient photos if possible before your next visit so they can have these ready for you as well.  Good luck!  

Randolph Capone, MD
Baltimore Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Sub-brow incision to lift the upper eyelid skin

+1

Morning Teacher

 

This is used and does well but it's more often used in Asian patients with thicker eyelid skin.  The reason that can be helpful or important is that when you perform a blepharoplasty on someone who is say over 45 and the skin is thick the fold created looks thicker and a bit unnatural.  That's one of the most common reasons this technique is used.  So yes, it's utilized but only in certain situations.

 

Best of luck

 

Chase Lay, MD

Chase Lay, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 42 reviews

Not a great idea

+1

The eyelid incision for a blepharoplasty is done in the eyelid crease and NOT near the brow. I would get a second opinion, or discuss this further with your surgeon:  maybe this is a misunderstanding?

A.J. Amadi, MD
Seattle Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Incisions for upper blepharoplasty

+1

In general, the incision for an upper blepharoplasty is always placed in the upper lid crease as it hides the best in this location. 

Jamil Asaria, MD
Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.