Flying a Month After Blepharoplasty?

I have a second upper eyelid surgery for levator recession. My eyelid still retract after first surgery, in fact it is worse, I now can't completely close my eye and feel pressure. I am having revision surgery. But I have to fly home a month after that. My concern is I flew alot (for work) post first surgery. And am concerned that might have been the reason levator has thickened or scar tissue caused issues. Does that happen? Also would flying 28 days after surgery be OK?

Doctor Answers (7)

Flying one month after lid surgery

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You should be fine to fly one month after your lid revision surgery.  I typically advise my patients to have activity restriction in the first one to two weeks but after removal of stitches I usually lift them if everything is progressing as expected.  Check with your surgeon given the history of the course of your first surgery but in general flying a month after surgery should be OK.


Orlando Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

No problem with flying 1 month after eyelid surgery

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Healing 1 month after surgery should be absolutely solid. Even pulling on the skin with your fingers would probably not result in the scar splitting open. Unless you have a healing disorder you should be fine.

Harlow Hollis, MD
Victoria Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Flying a Month After Blepharoplasty?

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In general, flying 1 month after a blepharoplasty should be fine.  However, it sounds like you have a complicated situation going on, and therefore you should discuss this with your surgeon who will tell you the definitive answer.

Sam Goldberger, MD
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

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Blepharoplasty: Common Questions

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Activity after a blepharoplasty should be limited during the first week of recovery until sutures are removed at the first post-operative visit is performed. Flying nearly a month after surgery will not alter your healing or the outcome of your surgery.

Be healthy and be well,
James M. Ridgway, MD, FACS
 

James M. Ridgway, MD, FACS
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Flying after blepharoplasty

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Dear anon,

In general, there is no reason why you shouldn't be able to fly if you are 1 week after blepharoplasty.  4 weeks after blepharoplasty should defintely be fine; however, I believe that you should discuss this with your surgeon to ensure that there are no other issues that should be considered. 

Good luck!

P. Daniel Ward, MD
Salt Lake City Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Airplane travel a month after eyelid surgery should not be a problem

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Dear 839449anon,  Eyelid procedures  such a revision blepharoplasty should not be affected by flying, but discuss this with your surgeon before scheduling your flight.  

In the immediate week after surgery, there are a variety of special circumstances where I would not want a post operative patient to fly, but only for their own comfort.  One of these circumstances is after nasal surgery. 

  • A person may have pressure or pain while flying after a nasal surgery  (rhinoplasty, septoplasty). This is caused by the same reason that babies cry when a plane is taking off and landing (Eustachian tube dysfunction / trouble with ears popping) 

Best wishes on your upcoming surgery.

Travis T. Tollefson, MD, MPH
Sacramento Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Flying a month after Upper Lid Surgery is SAFE

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Regarding: 'Flying a Month After Blepharoplasty?
I have a second upper eyelid surgery for levator recession. My eyelid still retract after first surgery, in fact it is worse, I now can't completely close my eye and feel pressure. I am having revision surgery. But I have to fly home a month after that. My concern is I flew alot (for work) post first surgery. And am concerned that might have been the reason levator has thickened or scar tissue caused issues. Does that happen? Also would flying 28 days after surgery be OK
?"

There is NO reason why you cannot fly a month after your upper lid surgery. By that time the healing will be well on its way and you risk very little. As regards the scarring from the first operation, there is NO evidence that I am aware of that flying in pressurized, commercial planes affect wound healing in any way.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.