Four Questions on Face Fillers?

I'm 51. With the assumption, that I am a good candidate for both fillers for marionette lines and Nasolabial... 1-Of all the face fillers, (incluidng fat) in worse case scenario, which ones can be reversed? 2-If they can't be reversed, which one has the least amount of waiting period before it disappears in the face? 3-Is there a way to test a filler first (small sample) or use another substance to see some results-I heard of saline? 4-Do you suggest trying a face filler before going with fat?

Doctor Answers (2)

Facial Fillers are easy to fix in most cases.

+1

Facial fillers such as radiesse, juvederm, restylane or belotero all do good in the nasolabial and marionette lines.  They are easy to correct by either disrupting them with a needle, massage and/or hyaluronidase injections. Cost runs about $550-650/syringe and usually need 2-3 syringes for full correction. Fat grafting doesn't usually do well in these areas. Artefill is a longer lasting filler that lasts 4-5 yrs and does need to be skin tested for allergies whereas the others do not. When in doubt then it is better to do fewer syringes to start with since you can always add more later. Sincerely,

David Hansen,MD


Beverly Hills Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Fillers

+1

Great questions.  Any of the hyaluronic acid fillers can be reversed.  This would include Restylane, Perlane and Juvederm.  I would certainly go with any of these before trying fat especially for the areas you want injected.  Fat would be more appropriate for full face volumizing.  It is a fairly simple thing to have saline injected into the areas as a trial to see how it might look - it will of course disappear overnight.  I hope this answers your questions.

Peter J. Jenkin, MD, FAAD
Seattle Dermatologic Surgeon

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