What Can Be Done to Fix Uneven Breasts After Augmentation?

I am 4 months post op with 375cc saline implants under the muscle. At three months I was very happy with the results. At 3 and half months my left breast shifted down and towards the side. I know from my before picture that my left breast was a little lower and I know BA can make that more noticible. I went to see my PS and he of course said to wait until 6 months but I am very sad/frustrated and not sure if anything can be done to fix them. Please let me know what my options my be. Thank you.

Doctor Answers (24)

Uneven Breasts after Augmentation Can Be Fixed

+3

Thank you for your question. Although you had Breast Asymmetry prior to your Breast Implants, the uneven Breast appearance has increased after Augmentation. This is common.

However, from your photos it appears that you have "bottomed out" slightly on the left compared to your early post op photos.

This Breast Implant Asymmetry can be corrected by an "Internal Capsulorraphy" which will reduce the size of the implant pocket and lift the implant.

It is best to wait at least 6 months for the implant to settle and the capsule to mature.

 

 


Boston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

What Can Be Done to Fix Uneven Breasts After Augmentation

+3

I agree that you may need a revision surgery to correct the asymmetry, however meanwhile, I would place you in a breast strap over the higher breast.  This may be effective enough to allow the higher breast capsule to strech and allow the implant to settle to a lower position.  If successful, you may not need another surgery.  Good luck!

Amy T. Bandy, DO, FACS
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 85 reviews

Breast Asymmetry

+2

Yes, most patients have asymmetry prior to surgery and we as plastic surgeon's try our best to adjust for that and improve things if possible.  I perform lots of revisionary breast surgery and Although there is no scientific study regarding this situation, I like to wait 9-12 months before performing this type of revisionary breast surgery.  This time frame will allow for both implants to “settle” as much as they are going to (so that we see the final results) and it also allows for capsule formation that will be helpful in capsulorrhaphy (internal repair).  Make sure you have confidence in your surgeon and see many before and after photos of patients with the same problem.  Experience is key for revisionary breast surgery.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 727 reviews

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Breast augmentation

+2

Assymetry after breast augmentation is common and can frequently be corrected. Most women have assymtry between the breast but certain technical items can be performed to fix this. Usually it is advised to wait 6 months prior to a revision

David L. Abramson, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Be patient to see final breast implant results.

+2

I do advise patients to wait 6 months to a year to see the final result.  Your breasts may not be done dropping. 

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Breast asymmetry after Breast Augmentation

+2

Hi there-

I'm sorry you are not happy...

Improving your asymmetry is going to require another operation....

It is important to understand that even with a revision, you are likely going to have some visible asymmetry, so you need to think about how badly the asymmetry you have bothers you, and whether it is enough to consider having another operation to improve...

With regard to the timing, while I understand your desire to achieve maximum symmetry right away, I would agree with your surgeon that your chances of achieving the best outcome possible increase the longer you wait (up to about 6 months).

Armando Soto, MD, FACS
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 102 reviews

Asymmetric breast before and after breast augmentation

+2

You are correct that you had asymmetric breasts prior to breast augmentation.  Unfortunately. that asymmetry gets augmented after breast augmentation.  If you are really unhappy with the asymmetry/result, you need to undergo a revisional surgery.  The options will be 1)Lowering of the IMF on the right  or 2) Getting periareolar or circumareolar breast lift on the left.  However, this is another surgery and you may have a new scar on the left breast.  Even after the revision surgery, you will always have some degree of asymmetry between the right and left breast.  Please remember that all women have a slight asymmetry in our breasts.

Sugene Kim, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Breast Asymmetry: To Fix or Not To Fix? (and When?)

+2

You are right to note that you had an asymmetry preop and that implants can make the natural asymmetry more noticeable.

All of us who perform breast augmentation face the challenges you present. The answers and possible solutions are very individualized.

How to decide whether to try to improve an asymmetry?

  1. Does it bother you enough to warrant an operation?
    1. Does the asymmetry show when you are dressed?
    2. Does the asymmetry show in swimwear?
    3. Even if concealed in clothing, does it make you self-conscious when naked?
  2. Will surgery reliably make enough of a difference?
    1. Risk/benefit
    2. Cost/benefit
  3. Which technique?
    1. Raise the left or drop the right?
    2. Tighten the lower pocket with sutures or use of allograft (graft from a tissue donor bank) for support?

When to do a revision or asymmetry repair?

The answers can't be easily simplified in an on-line inquiry. Your surgeon's professional judgment is a valuable resource to you and you should stay in close contact with him/her and openly express your concerns.

Second opinion is an option to consider and can be very reassuring, but, as you can see from the different opinions expressed here, experts may disagree.

In general, time is on your side in that the problems you see do not require emergency intervention. Many plastic surgeons will consider a 6 month time frame in evaluating implant position issues after a breast augmentation.

Paul C. Zwiebel, MD
Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Post-op Breast Asymmetry

+1
Although you did indeed have some breast asymmetry pre-operatively, it appears in your most recent photos that your left implant may have 'bottomed out' slightly, adding to the exaggerated difference. Although this can be a frustrating result, it is fixable. Usually it is advisable to wait at least 6 months, if not more, before considering undergoing additional corrective surgery. Revisionary procedures tend to be more complicated than initial surgeries because the breast tissue has already been affected and manipulated. For this reason, it is a great idea to wait for that period of time to ensure the proper healing has taken place. Additionally, within that time, a capsule forms around the implant. This capsule is comprised of strong, fibrous tissue, and can actually be used as an added benefit when an implant bottoms out. Because it is stronger than the soft tissues of the natural breast, it can be used to help support the implant and position it properly during revisionary surgery. Additionally, if you have very flimsy tissues, a product called Strattice can also be used to help support the implant and help the weakened tissues from tearing. However, this product is costly, and should only be used if your surgeon thinks you would be a good candidate. 

Frank Campanile, MD
Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Asymetrical Breast

+1

The easiest solution is to lower the right side to match the right.  Also, it seems that the right side may be alittle smaller.  If so I would place in a slightly larger implant.  Raising the right is not a good option.

Miguel Delgado, Jr., MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.