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Fix Nose Crater Left by Dermatologist? (Photo)

I went to my dermatologist about 6 weeks ago to have a flesh-colored bump removed from the side of my nose. They ended up digging way into the skin instead of shaving it flat, and I now have an unsightly divot on my nose. It gets very red during the day and seems to be getting much worse. I am extremely self-conscious about it, and my dermatologist doesn't really seem to care. He recommended dermabrasion, but not for at least a YEAR? They told me it would be flat and healed, and now won't help.

Doctor Answers (5)

Fractional laser for a nose depressed scar

+1

Once the swelling has subsided, I would recommend fractional co2 laser to resurface the scar over dermabrasion. Raffy Karamanoukian, Los Angeles


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Small Indented Face and Nose Scars Respond Well To Combined Subcision & Filling

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In general, indentations and divets following shave removals of all kinds fill in spontandously and flatten over the course of a year. Typically, the undesirable redness, also part of initial wound healing, will also fade with time--as a rule much before the spot flattens. Given this, II do not rush to recommend therapy in such cases. In the interim, the redness can be covered with makeup.

Should the indentation not improve sufficiently after a sufficient amount of time has elapsed, I would simply numb the area with local anesthetic and perform a subcision to break up the fibrous scar tissue below that is tethering the skin down and instill a tiny amount of a combination of Radiesse and Perlane-L. Subcision promotes new native collagen synthesis (neocollagenesis) and allows for the possiblity of permanent improvement over the next several months. At the same time, the addition of the injectable volumizing agents generally gives nearly complete immediate improvement in contour and also creates the proper tissue environment for further stimulating native new collagen further increasing the likelihood a more long-lasting result.

The procedure takes no more than five minutes to perform with little or no downtime.

Nelson Lee Novick, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

How to repair a crater in the nasal tip skin after a shave biopsy

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Dermabrasion can be a great way of revising scar on the face. I usually recommend waiting 2-3 months after the initial procedure before doing the dermabrasion. The idea is to allow the scar tissue cells in the skin in the area to partially mature.

You can check out my web reference link below to see how scar revision can be used on the nasal tip. The case reviewed in the link is a bit different than yours but you can see how the nasal tip skin responds to dermabrasion.

Thomas A. Lamperti, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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Fix Nose Crater Left by Dermatologist?

+1

Dermabrasion can be very effective for the contour in this area. We usually delay dermabrasion for about six weeks rather than one year. You might consider a second opinion with another Dermatologist or Facial Plastic Surgeon. Either way, ensure that you wear sunscreen every day to minimize darkening of the scar tissue.

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Fractional Laser Resurfacing for Divot in Nose.

+1

Hi Fluff.  There are a couple different options for you at this point.  While the scar should improve over the course of the year, it may not be flat at that time, based on the photo you posted.

If the redness is the primary concern then we would use the V-star pulsed dye (vascular) laser to get rid of the redness.  If the texture is the issue, we would use the Sciton Profractional Erbium (resurfacing) laser.  This would help make the texture more even.  Good luck.

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.