How Can I Fix my Nose Unevenness and Asymmetry? (photo)

My left nostril is indented, and droops lower than my right. I believe I have a collapsed valve on my left too, since manipulating my cheek/nose improves my breathing significantly on the left side of my face. I have no significant issues with my nose width, flare or my nose bridge height. I just want to fix my asymmetry and be able to breathe through my nose. What procedures would help me correct these problems? Thanks

Doctor Answers (6)

How Can I Fix my Nose Unevenness and Asymmetry?

+1

Over the internet is not the forum you should be seeking. Obtain many in person evaluations. I might try a filler to even out the very very minor asymmetry. 


Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

How Can I Fix my Nose Unevenness and Asymmetry?

+1

     The nostril issue may not be worth fixing.  The tip can be made smaller if you would like.  The breathing issues will require an examination.   Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of rhinoplasties and rhinoplasty revisions each year.  Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.

Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

 

 

 

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 209 reviews

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Surgery for improvement of nasal breathing

+1

 When patients have nasal obstruction the first option is medical management which consists of nasal sprays, antihistamines, and decongestants. When patients fail medical management, consideration for surgery is entertained. There are multiple anatomical processes the can  create nasal obstruction, and these include a deviated nasal septum, turbinate hypertrophy, valve collapse, vestibular stenosis, and allergies. Each one of these are treated differently. It is probably best to see a ENT/ rhinoplasty surgeon to try to make the diagnosis and come up with a game plan once you have been examined. For more information please see the link below

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Asymmetry of the nose corrected with rhinoplasty

+1

Your photos provide some information but not enough to give a complete answer.

 

I will address what I can.  First off, you have a very boxy tip.  Boxy tips are associated with medially oriented and overly convex lateral crus of the the lower lateral cartilages.  With this configuration both the internal and external nasal valves are not appropriately supported.

So a rhinoplasty where your lower lats are dissected free, flattened and reoriented toward the lateral canthus (instead of the medial canthus as they are now).  You might also benefit from a batten and/or strut graft to further augment the support of the lateral ala and sidewall soft tissues.

I suggest you visit with a number of plastic surgeons.  Talk to them about the details I gave to you above.  If have a glazed over look or avoid specifics move on until you find one who embraces your challenge scientifically.

Now with regard to asymmetry, that is where your photos fail to convey enough info.  Nonetheless, Ill take your word for it - you have asymmetry.  There can be many causes of this.  Septal deviation may be at play.  Correcting this and reducing the lower turbinates could help.

Good luck.

 

BTW - I see you are in laurel md,  I grew up in colombia just to the north.  Keep in mind BWI has flights to austin.  I would be happy to see you here.

Adam Bryce Weinfeld, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Reconstructive rhinoplasty

+1

With just your limited photographs it is difficult to understand your nasal anatomy and guide you toward a surgical technique.  You may need a septoplasty, turbinectomy and possibly spreader grafts.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.