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How to Fix Blepharoplasty and Epicanthoplasty Results?

I am 4 weeks post op from revisional upper Blepharoplasty and epicanthoplasty. I am really unhappy with the results. My surgeon denies removing too much skin but my eyes can't shut fully.

I had my first surgery 6 years ago and my eyelids looked natural when closed with a flat scar but now I still see a fold above the incision which flattens out slightly when my eyebrows are raised. What went wrong? Is this my surgeons' skill in question or is it with the way I healed? How can I fix this and how long should I wait?

Doctor Answers (2)

Unhappy result after secondary blepharoplasty

+1

Your eyelids especially the left, doesn't close. It is still very soon after surgery so I would advise you to talk with your doctor. You may need to do a massage, or just be patient.

Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

You're very early from your last surgery

+1

Dear Indie

I agree that you probably have an issue. Your before picture looked pretty good with minor looseness of the eyelid platform skin and eyelash ptosis. Both are easily corrected with a microscopic anchor blepharoplasty.

In your case, your after pictures suggest that the doctor was pretty aggressive removing upper eyelid skin as demonstrated by the incision that extend laterally rather than following the upper eyelid contour. Also the incision does look high. For only 4 weeks out, the epicanthal fold surgery actually looks like it is healing well.

It will be several months before your upper eyelids have healed enough to know where the upper eyelid folds will settle to. It will be longer before you are ready for revisional surgery, assuming that you will need and want it. In the mean time, there is really nothing to do but allow yourself to heal. Please recontact the Realself community as you heal.

Web reference: http://www.lidlift.com

Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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