I've Had Breast Implants and Multiple Revisions in the last 15yrs and Noticed a Swelling Near Areola

I've had breast implants for 15 years with multiple changes going larger three times, later switching from saline to silicone and two years ago having a revision on the left to create more gap in the cleavage area. I've noticed lately that the left side has areas in the center of the breast on the outer part of the areola that feel somewhat firm, maybe lumpy. Otherwise the rest of the breast feels soft. Can this be scar tissue from having had multiple surgeries (5 in total) or fat necrosis?

Doctor Answers (3)

Breast Lumps need to be evaluated

+1

All breast lumps need to be evaluated,  if you have had implants are not.  A minimum would be a mammogram and an ultrasound.  A needle biopsy or maybe an open biopsy might be needed to confirm a diagnosis.  Breast cancer is very common ( 8-9% of all women) and needs to be ruled out first.


Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Dont assume that a breast lump is fat necrosis.

+1

Although it is indeed possible that a firm area of breast (especially after multiple operations) could be fat necrosis, but this must be investigated. Any palpable lump that does not go away must be assumed to be a breast cancer until proven otherwise. First, have your surgeon examine you. Then, if need be obtain a mammogram, ultrasound or breast MRI.

Kevin Brenner, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Firm, Lumpy Areas on Breasts?

+1

Thank you for the question.

Any change in the feel of your breasts should be evaluated by your physicians. Breast exam and breast imaging ( mammogram, ultrasound, MRI)  may be necessary.  Please do not assume that the new breast findings are related to the breast implants and/or previous breast surgery.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 680 reviews

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