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Filing Down Dorsal Hump. Is Surgery Necessary?

The hump on my nose is not that big at all. But I want to get it filed down a little. I don't mind there being a tiny hump there. That being said, I wouldn't have to worry about surgery if I'm not getting the hump filed down completely?

Doctor Answers (8)

Surgery is necessary to file down dorsal hump

+1

Surgery is necessary to file down a dorsal hump.  The hump on the nose is composed of both bone and cartilage.  Once the hump has been filed down, most patients will require osteotomies to close the now created open roof deformity.  The rhinoplasty procedure must be performed under a general anesthesia, as this surgery is not tolerated under only a local.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Filing down a dorsal hump is surgery, by definition

+1

Filing down a dorsal hump is surgery, by definition. If that is the only change to your nose that you desire then it can be performed with a minimally invasive approach with small incisions hidden in the nostrils. However, it does require surgery and typically IV sedation for anesthesia. I hope this information is helpful.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Hump removal

+1

In order to "file down" your dorsal hump, you will need a surgical procedure.  Sorry, but that is the only way to do it.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

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Filing Down Dorsal Hump. Is Surgery Necessary?

+1

 Reducing the dorsal hump requires lifting up the tissues, of the nose and using a nasal rasp to remove the excess nasal bone and cartilage.  This does require surgery (Rhinoplasty) to accomplish the goal.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Hump removal is surgery

+1

Hump removal is indeed surgery, and only in a few cases can we just 'file it down' and get a great result. As the hump is reduced, even a little, the bridge can be flattened. Imagine removing the top off a letter A. Fractures can allow the bridge to be reshaped to accomodate the new height of the bridge.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Hump refinement

+1

If you are only interested in a mild reduction of a dorsal hump, a closed approach is most appropriate.  While this is still surgery, it is the least invasive method for addressing the problem, and hence you will tend to have a faster recovery.  Depending on your anatomy, a small hump reduction may require nothing more than filing down the dorsum.  If you have a wide bony nasal base, or a large reduction is performed, you might also need osteotomies.  Visit a surgeon who specializes in rhinoplasty and discuss your goals.  

Best regards,

Dr.B

Michael A. Bogdan, MD, FACS
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Hump removal with Rhinoplasty

+1

Rhinoplasty doesn't mean that you can't make decisions in terms of what you would like your nose to look like.  Unlike the "old" days where you may end up with a "Doctor so-and-so" nose, today we can make refinements in various aspects of the nose (ie. tip, dorsum, nostrils.)  

 

So, in your case, we could remove just as much of the "hump" as you like.  Ultimately, we would like your nose to look natural and balances with your face.

Jon E. Mendelsohn, MD
Cincinnati Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Filing Down Dorsal Hump

+1

Depending on the size of your hump and how much you want to remove, it may or may not be necessary to fracture the nasal bones (osteotomies). You and your surgeon will discuss your goals and decide what will be done before surgery. 

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.